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vocabularyfarrar

The unique vocabulary found in The Life of Christ, by Frederic William Farrar


Frederic William Farrar, in his epic tome entitled “The Life of Christ”, displayed his unparalleled command of the English language in choice of words and phrasing.  I have listed below many of the erudite words that Mr. Farrar used in his book, to the edification and enlightenment of all.  The definition is followed by two numbers, the first being the page number and the second being the line number where the word is used; for example votaries – a person, such as a monk or nun, who has made vows of dedication to a religious work or effort (ix,31)” means that the word ‘votaries’ is found on page ix, line 31 of the book.  


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  • abhorrence — a feeling of repulsion; disgusted loathing  (xiv, 27)
  • abject — relating to something bad experienced or present to the maximum degree  (28, 39)
  • abrogate — repeal or do away with (a law, right, or formal agreement; repudiate, revoke  (48, 33)
  • absurd — ridiculous, nonsensical  (15, 41)
  • acquiescence — the reluctant acceptance of something without protest, concurrence  (45, 15)
  • actuate — cause someone or something to act in a particular way; motivate  (25, 36)
  • adventitious — happening or carried on according to chance rather than design or inherent nature, unintentional  (37, 13)
  • affectation –behavior, speech, or writing that is artificial and designed to impress  (vi, 37)
  • agitate — make someone or something troubled, nervous, or disturbed  (4, 20)
  • alien — unfamiliar and disturbing or distasteful., unfamiliar, unknown, foreign  (40, 23)
  • allegory — a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one  (40, 38)
  • allude — suggest or call attention to indirectly; hint at; imply, touch on  (40, 30)
  • allusion — an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference  (41, 1; 41, 26; 41,31; 42, 23)
  • anecdote — a short amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person  (8, 2; 24, 37)
  • animosity — strong hostility or enmity  (4, 20)
  • apocryphal — of a story or statement of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true  (5, 36; 8, 32; 16, 21; 17, 13; 33, 33)
  • apologist — a person who offers an argument in defense of something controversial  (viii, 17)
  • appellation — a name or title, a designation  (24, 21)
  • aristocracy — the highest class in certain societies, especially those holding hereditary titles or offices  (37, 37)
  • ascetic — engaging in severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons  (40, 28; 45, 20)
  • asperity — harshness of tone or manner  (xiv, 8)
  • atheism — disbelief or lack of belief in the existence of God or gods  (48, 31)
  • atrocious — horrifyingly wicked  (18, 19)
  • atrocity — an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury  (20, 7; 21, 3)
  • august — respected and impressive, distinguished  (35, 33)
  • aureate — denoting, made of, or having the color of gold; ornamented, elaborate  (26, 37)

B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B

  • barbarian — an uncultured or brutish person  (19, 35)
  • beguile — charm or enchant someone, sometimes in a deceptive way  (33, 20)
  • beneficent — generous. doing or contributing to good; benevolent, altruistic  (44, 6)
  • bier — a movable frame on which a coffin or a corpse is placed before burial or cremation or on which it is carried to the grave  (21, 25)
  • blasphemous — sacrilegious against God or sacred things; profane, vulgar  (27, 10)
  • brazen — bold and without shame, or made of brass  (28, 23)
  • brevity — concise and exact use of words in writing or speech  (xii, 6)
  • brigand — a member of a gang that ambushes and robs people in forests and mountains  (11, 20)
  • broider — to ornament with embroidery or cloth decorations  (23, 31)

C-C-C-C-C-C-C-C

  • cabalistic — relating to or associated with mystical interpretation or esoteric doctrine  (41, 13)
  • callosity — a hardening, a thickening; obstinacy  (49, 1)
  • callow —  inexperienced and immature; naïve, green  (43, 6)
  • candid — truthful and straightforward; frank  (vii, 31; 15, 33))
  • candor — the quality of being open and honest in expression; frankness  (viii, 16)
  • captious — tending to find fault or raise petty objections  (viii, 2)
  • caravanserai — an inn with a central courtyard for travelers in the desert regions of Asia or North Africa  (5, 8)
  • celibacy — the state of abstaining from marriage and sexual relations  (48, 26)
  • colossal — extremely large, massive, enormous  (47, 3)
  • conducive — making a certain situation or outcome likely or possible  (42, 41)
  • confirmation — verification, proof, endorsement  (7, 9)
  • congealed — having become semisolid, especially on cooling  (40, 39)
  • conjecture — an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information  (7, 10; 8, 8; 12, 34; 14, 12; 35, 17; 42, 25)
  • consolation — the comfort received by a person after a loss or disappointment; sympathy, solace  (48, 21)
  • conspicuous — standing out so as to be clearly visible, attracting notice or attention  (47, 1)
  • contemptuous — showing disdain and derision; scornful  (vii, 31; 13, 12; 48, 18)
  • contentious — given to arguing or provoking argument; argumentative, quarrelsome  (44, 41)
  • courtier –a person who attends a royal court as a companion or adviser to the king or queen  (5, 1)
  • credulity — a tendency to be too ready to believe that something is real or true  (15, 34)
  • crimson — of a rich deep red color inclining to purple  (9, 1)
  • crypt — an underground room or vault beneath a church, used as a chapel or burial place  (2, 11)

D-D-D-D-D-D-D-D

  • decadent — characterized by or reflecting a state of moral or cultural decline  (vii, 19)
  • decimated — drastically reduced in the strength or effectiveness of something  (19, 8)
  • decipherable — able to be understood, interpreted, or identified  (38, 25)
  • declivity — a downward slope  (23, 1)
  • decrepit — worn out or ruined because of age or neglect; infirm  (ix, 12)
  • decrepitude — the state of being decrepit, infirm, frail, or weak  (11, 7)
  • deference — humble submission and respect  (4, 6)
  • degraded — reduced in quality; inferior (48, 19)
  • degradation — the condition or process of degrading or being degraded; humiliation, shame  (48, 32)
  • delirium — an acutely disturbed state of mind that occurs in fever, intoxication, and other disorders and is characterized by restlessness, illusions, and incoherence of thought and speech  (21, 22)
  • demoniac — of, like, or characteristic of a demon or demons, fiendish, satanic  (17, 22)
  • denounce — publicly declare to be wrong or evil; criticize, condemn  (41, 8)
  • denunciation — public condemnation of someone or something  (ix, 7)
  • depositary — a person to whom something is lodged in trust  (4, 17)
  • despicable — deserving hatred and contempt, loathsome, hateful  (11, 25)
  • despot — a ruler or other person who holds absolute power, typically one who exercises it in a cruel or oppressive way  (18, 22)
  • destined — certain to meet a particular fate, fated, predestined  (47, 35)
  • devoid — entirely lacking or free from  (4, 37)
  • diaphanous — relating to a low-pitched fog signal operated by compressed air, characterized by the “grunt” that ends each note  (47, 6)
  • dirge — a lament for the dead, especially one forming part of a funeral rite  (33, 6)
  • discontinuity — a sharp difference of characteristics between parts of something  (6, 25)
  • discrepancy — a lack of compatibility or similarity between two or more facts  (7, 31)
  • disdain — the feeling that someone or something is unworthy of one’s consideration or respect; contempt, scorn  (24, 21)
  • disseminate — to spread something, especially information, widely; to distribute  (13, 23)
  • dissimulate — conceal or disguise one’s thoughts, feelings, or character  (11, 17)
  • distasteful — causing dislike or disgust; offensive; unpleasant  (4, 13)
  • dogmatic — inclined to lay down principles as incontrovertibly true; opinionated, highly assertive  (8, 35; 44, 40)
  • dotage — the period of life in which a person is old and weak; the declining years  (48, 30)

E-E-E-E-E-E-E-E

  • eclectic — deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources  (40, 13)
  • effeminate — relating to a man who has or shows characteristics regarded as typical of a woman; unmanly, effete, unmanly  (38, 4)
  • effete — no longer capable of effective action, weak, feeble  (13, 1)
  • eloquence — fluent or persuasive speaking or writing, expressiveness  (25, 13)
  • emancipate — set free, especially from legal, social, or political restrictions  (31, 9)
  • embalm — preserve a corpse from decay, originally with spices and now usually by arterial injection of a preservative  (40, 3)
  • eminently — to a notable degree; very; extremely  (42, 41)
  • enigma — a person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand  (ix, 33)
  • ephemerid — a table or data file giving the calculated positions of a celestial object at regular intervals throughout a period  (38, 36)
  • ephod — a sleeveless garment worn by Jewish priests  (42, 37)
  • epicurean — devoted to sensual enjoyment, especially that derived from fine food and drink; hedonistic  (40, 24)
  • epiphany — a manifestation of a divine or supernatural being; a moment of sudden revelation or insight; the manifestation of Christ on earth  (10, 32)
  • epitaph — a phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone  (42, 4)
  • epoch — a period of time in history or a person’s life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics  (18, 26; 48, 23)
  • erudite — having or showing great knowledge or learning  (vi, 39)
  • erudition — the quality of having or showing great knowledge or learning; scholarship  (40, 10)
  • evanescent — soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing  (13, 33)
  • evangelic — of or according to the teaching of the gospel or the Christian religion  (26, 25)
  • evidential — of or providing evidence  (ix, 26)
  • ewer — a large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying water for someone to wash in  (28, 23)
  • exaggerated — regarded or represented as larger, better, or worse than in reality  (37, 21)
  • excruciating — intensely painful, mentally distressing  (19, 6)
  • exegesis — critical explanation or interpretation of a text, especially of scripture  (14, 9)
  • extant — still in existence; surviving, remaining, abiding  (29, 21)

F-F-F-F-F-F-F-F

  • fabulist — a person who composes or relates fables, a storyteller  (26, 13)
  • fancy — as a verb, to feel a desire or liking for  (8, 35)
  • fawning — displaying exaggerated flattery or affection; obsequious  (19, 20)
  • ferocity — the state of being barbarous, violent, cruel, or savage  (19, 33)
  • fidelity — faithfulness to a person, cause, or belief, demonstrated by continuing loyalty and support  (48, 21)
  • floweret — one of the small flowers making up a composite flower head; a floret of cauliflower or broccoli  (37, 1)
  • formidable — inspiring fear or respect through being impressively large, powerful, intense, or capable  (vii, 38)
  • fragmentary — consisting of small parts that are disconnected or incomplete  (7, 5)
  • frenzy — a state or period of uncontrolled excitement or wild behavior  (21, 15)
  • frivolous — not having any serious purpose or value; flippant, glib  (41, 7)

G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G

  • garland — a wreath of flowers and leaves, worn on the head or hung as a decoration  (32, 11)
  • germane — relevant to a subject under consideration
  • gilded — covered thinly with gold leaf or gold paint, or gifted and privileged  (33, 2; 37, 30)
  • gluttony — habitual greed or excess in eating  (37, 31)

H-H-H-H-H-H-H-H

  • habitually — done or doing constantly or as a habit; continually  (42, 24)
  • Hagiographa — the books of the Bible comprising the last of the three major divisions of the Hebrew scriptures, other than the Law and the Prophets. The books of the Hagiographa are: Ruth, Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Daniel, Esther, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles  (41, 32)
  • hallowed — greatly revered and honored, consecrated  (27, 32)
  • harmonize — make consistent or compatible  (2, 15)
  • headship — the position of leader or chief  (45, 8)
  • heretical — holding an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted, especially regarding religious beliefs  (34, 34)
  • hoarse — sounding rough and harsh, typically as the result of a sore throat or of shouting; throaty, croaking in nature  (43, 5)

I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I

  • idyll —  an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or scene, typically an idealized or unsustainable one  (1, 5)
  • idyllic — relating to a time or place or situation that is extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque  (7, 3)
  • ignoble — not honorable in character or purpose  (v, 28)
  • ignominious — deserving or causing public disgrace or shame, humiliating, shameful  (24, 20)
  • illiterate — unable to read or write  (40, 1)
  • illusory — based on illusion; not real, imagined, imaginary  (21, 28)
  • impetuosity — the tendency to act or respond quickly and without thought or care; impulsiveness  (45, 33)
  • impotent — unable to take effective action; helpless or powerless; powerless, ineffective  (41, 7)
  • impugn — dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of a statement or motive; call into question  (vii, 32)
  • incessant — continuing without pause or interruption  (vi, 9; 35, 36)
  • inconceivable — not capable of being imagined or grasped mentally; unbelievable  (18, 19)
  • indifference — lack of interest, concern, or sympathy  (2, 3)
  • indignant — feeling or showing anger or annoyance at what is perceived as unfair treatment  (41, 37)
  • indignation — anger or annoyance provoked by what is perceived as unfair treatment  (11, 17; 39, 12)
  • indisputable — unable to be challenged or denied  (11, 5; 42, 23)
  • indolent — wanting to avoid activity or exertion; lazy; slothful, idle  (22, 26)
  • ineffable — too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words, beyond description  (25, 24)
  • inestimable — too great to calculate  (ix, 33; 24, 37)
  • infamous — well known for some bad quality or deed, wicked, abominable  (20, 7)
  • infanticide — the practice or crime, either by a society or by a person, of killing unwanted children soon after birth  (18, 22)
  • infer — deduce or conclude information from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements  (39, 5)
  • infringement — the action of breaking the terms of a law, agreement, or arrangement; a violation  (4, 7)
  • injunction — an authoritative warning or order  (31, 7)
  • insinuate — suggest or hint something bad or reprehensible in an indirect and unpleasant way; intimate  (40, 13)
  • insolent — showing a rude and arrogant lack of respect  (19, 24; 39, 41)
  • insouciance — the trait of showing a casual lack of concern; indifference  (40, 24)
  • insuperable — impossible to overcome  (viii, 1)
  • insurrection — a violent uprising against an authority or government  (4, 8)
  • intelligible — able to be understood; comprehensible; comprehensible, accessible  (42, 5)
  • intimation — an indication or hint  (9, 38)
  • intrude — put oneself deliberately into a place or situation where one is unwelcome or uninvited  (8, 35)
  • intrusion — to put oneself deliberately into a place or situation where one is unwelcome or uninvited  (3, 8)
  • irreconcilable — of ideas or facts representing points of view that are so different from each other that they cannot be made compatible  (7, 30; 40, 23)
  • irrefragable — not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable  (xiv, 16)
  • irrelevant — not connected with or relevant to something  (7, 13)

J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J

  • jocund — cheerful, lighthearted

K-K-K-K-K-K-K-K

  • khan –in the Middle East, an inn for travelers, built around a central courtyard; a caravanserai  (2, 23)

L-L-L-L-L-L-L-L

  • lamentation — the passionate expression of grief or sorrow; weeping  (18, 17)
  • languor — the state or feeling of being tired, listless, or tranquil  (4, 23; 38, 4)
  • legate— a general or governor of an ancient Roman province, or their deputy  (4, 5)
  • libration — an apparent or real oscillation of the moon, by which parts near the edge of the disc that are often not visible from the earth sometimes come into view  (30, 21)
  • lichen — a simple slow-growing plant that typically forms a low crusty, leaflike, or branching growth on rocks, walls, and trees  (38, 23)
  • lore — a body of traditions and knowledge on a subject or held by a particular group, typically passed from person to person by word of mouth  (41, 12)

M-M-M-M-M-M-M-M

  • malignant — spiteful, hostile, malicious  (17, 38)
  • mandate — to give someone authority to act in a certain way; to require something to be done; to make mandatory  (18, 3)
  • maxim — a short, pithy statement expressing a general truth or rule of conduct  (41, 2)
  • mean — lowly, humble  (5, 10)
  • meanness — unkindness, spitefulness, or unfairness: also, lack of quality or attractiveness; shabbiness  (37, 24)
  • mercenary — relating to a person or their behavior who is primarily concerned with making money at the expense of ethics  (5, 4)
  • minaret — a tall slender tower, typically part of a mosque, with a balcony from which a muezzin calls Muslims to prayer  (24, 8)
  • minstrelsy — the art or occupation of a medieval minstrel, including shows, songs, dances, and comedy routines  (1, 14)
  • minutiae — the small, precise, or trivial details of something  (viii, 3)
  • mirth — amusement, especially as expressed in laughter, merriment  (33, 20)
  • mummified — preserve by embalming and wrapping in cloth, usually referring to a body  (40, 3)
  • musing — a period of reflection or thought  (46, 7)
  • myriad — a countless or extremely great number, a plethora  (38, 19)

N-N-N-N-N-N-N-N

  • nebulous — in the form of a cloud or haze; hazy, vague, indefinite  (14, 23)

O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O

  • obdurate — stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action, unbending, stubborn
  • obscurity — the state of being unknown, inconspicuous, or unimportant  (18, 10; 48, 4)
  • obstinacy — the quality or condition of being obstinate; stubbornness; inflexibility  (45, 29)
  • obviate — to remove a need or difficulty  (18, 29)
  • orthodox — conforming to what is generally or traditionally accepted as right or true; established and approved  (26, 13)

P-P-P-P-P-P-P-P

  • palliate — to allay or moderate fears or suspicions; disguise the seriousness or gravity of an offense  (20, 15)
  • palpable — of a feeling or atmosphere so intense as to seem almost tangible  (viii, 37)
  • pang — a sudden sharp pain or painful emotion  (4, 24)
  • parhelion — a bright spot in the sky appearing on either side of the sun, formed by refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the earth’s atmosphere  (6, 17)
  • pariah — an outcast, a stray, someone of low socioeconomic level  (3, 9)
  • paroxysm — a sudden attack or violent expression of a particular emotion or activity  (11, 10)
  • pauper — a very poor and destitute person  (28, 38)
  • perennial — lasting or existing for a long or apparently infinite time; enduring or continually recurring  (43, 3)
  • pernicious — having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way, harmful, destructive  (27, 14)
  • petulant — childishly sulky or bad-tempered,  ill-tempered  (27, 1)
  • phalanx — a body of troops or police officers standing or moving in close formation  (47, 33)
  • piety — the quality of being religious or reverent  (2, 7; 44, 10)
  • pious — devoutly religious; also, making a hypocritical display of virtue  (29, 5; 35, 31; 48, 15)
  • pitiless — showing no pity; cruel  (19, 31)
  • plumage — a bird’s feathers collectively (33, 41)
  • plumes — a long, soft feather or arrangement of feathers used by a bird for display or worn by a person for ornament  (46, 33)
  • plunderer — one who steals goods from a place or person, typically using force and in a time of war or civil disorder  (11, 15)
  • polemic — a strong verbal or written attack on someone or something  (vii, 29)
  • portent — a sign or warning that something, especially something momentous or calamitous, is likely to happen  (13, 28)
  • portentous — done in a pompously or overly solemn manner so as to impress; also foreshadowing  (26, 14; 49, 3)
  • precocity — developing certain abilities or proclivities at an earlier age than usual, advanced, forward-looking, wise beyond one’s years  (31, 28)
  • prejudice — preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience  (4, 7)
  • pretension — a claim or assertion of a claim to something  (11, 20; 13, 29)
  • prima facie — based on the first impression; accepted as correct until proved otherwise  (45, 1)
  • proclivity — a tendency to choose or do something regularly; an inclination or predisposition toward a particular thing  (10, 20)
  • procurator — an agent representing others in a court of law in countries retaining Roman civil law  (34, 10; 48, 18)
  • prodigality — the inclination to spend money or resources freely and recklessly; the proclivity to be wastefully extravagant  (17, 23)
  • prodigious — remarkably or impressively great in extent, size, or degree, huge, colossal  (15, 38)
  • profane — not respectful of orthodox religious practice; irreverent, vile  (33, 41)
  • proposition — a statement or assertion that expresses a judgment or opinion; a premise or postulation  (40, 22)
  • provincial — concerning the regions outside the capital city of a country, especially when regarded as unsophisticated or narrow-minded  (37, 18)
  • prudence — sound judgement, sagacity, wisdom, cautiousness  (31, 25)
  • puerile — childishly silly and trivial  (27, 2; 41, 13)

Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q

  • quixotic — exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical

R-R-R-R-R-R-R-R

  • rapture — a feeling of intense pleasure or joy  (1, 16)
  • redemption — the action of saving or being saved from sin, error, or evil; absolution, saving  (48, 7)
  • regenerate — bring into renewed existence; generate again, revitalize, restore  (38, 11)
  • remediable — capable of being cured or rectified; treatable  (37, 27)
  • reproach — address someone in such a way as to express disapproval or disappointment  (34, 4)
  • reprobate — an unprincipled person; a rogue or scoundrel  (40, 31)
  • repugnant — extremely distasteful; unacceptable; revolting, disgusting  (40, 26)
  • reticence — the trait of not revealing one’s thoughts or feelings readily  (7, 4; 7, 17; 25, 14)
  • rife — commonly occurring, widespread, full of  (18, 23)
  • ritualism — the regular observance or practice of ritual, especially when excessive or without regard to its function  (41, 6)
  • ruddy —  having a healthy red or reddish color  (3, 35; 12, 18)

S-S-S-S-S-S-S-S

  • sacrilegious — profane, blasphemous, impious, irreverent  (11, 14)
  • sanctifying — making legitimate or binding by religious sanction; freeing from sin, purifying  (43, 31)
  • sanctions — threatened penalties for disobeying a law or rule  (37, 33)
  • sanguinary — involving or causing much bloodshed  (19, 17)
  • sarcophagus — a stone coffin, adorned with a sculpture or inscription, associated with the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Rome, and Greece  (33, 22)
  • scanty — small or insufficient in quantity or amount; meager, minimal  (45, 14)
  • scepter — an ornamented staff carried by rulers on ceremonial occasions as a symbol of sovereignty  (48, 17)
  • sententious — given to moralizing in a pompous or affected manner  (40, 6)
  • servitor — a person who serves or attends on a social superior  (11, 18)
  • Shechinah — a Hebrew word meaning “dwelling” or “settling” and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God  (44, 17)
  • sidereal — of or with respect to the distant star  (13, 19)
  • sloth — reluctance to work or make an effort; laziness  (40, 26)
  • sorcery — the use of magic, especially black magic  (44, 6)
  • spurious — not being what it purports to be; false or fake  (5, 39; 20, 21)
  • steeped — surrounded by or filled with a quality or influence  (20, 36)
  • stigma — a mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person  (38, 2)
  • stupendous — extremely impressive  (ix, 26; 6, 4)
  • suckle — to feed a baby or young animal from the breast or teat  (18, 3)
  • supercilious — behaving or looking as though one thinks one is superior to others, haughty, conceited  (30, 12; 40, 9)
  • superfluous — unnecessary, especially through being more than enough  (17, 23)
  • supple — bending and moving easily and gracefully; flexible  (48, 20)
  • supposition — an uncertain belief  (12, 36)
  • sycophant — a person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage;  a toady, a fawner  (20, 18)

T-T-T-T-T-T-T-T

  • tedium — monotony, dullness, boredom  (33, 21)
  • teem — to be full of or swarming with  (32, 2)
  • temperament — a person’s or animal’s nature, especially as it permanently affects their behavior  (8, 2)
  • terebinth — a small southern European tree of the cashew family that was formerly a source of turpentine  (47, 5)
  • tetrarch — in the Roman Empire, the governor of one of four divisions of a country or province  (48, 18)
  • theosophy — philosophies maintaining that a knowledge of God may be achieved through spiritual ecstasy, direct intuition, or individual relations  (40, 38)
  • throes — intense or violent pain and struggle, especially accompanying birth, death, or great change; agony, pain  (48, 28)
  • timbral — a tambourine or similar instrument  (33, 21)
  • tincture — a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol, or a slight trace of something  (40, 8)
  • tinge — have a slight influence on; imbue slightly with a feeling or quality; to color slightly  (9, 1; 34, 41)
  • toilsome — involving hard or tedious work  (3, 36)
  • torpor — a state of physical or mental inactivity; lethargy  (18, 10)
  • transcendent — beyond or above the range of normal or merely physical human experience, exceptional, preeminent  (35, 34; 39, 19)
  • transient — lasting only for a short time; impermanent  (20, 9)
  • transitory — not permanent; transient, temporary  (43, 4)
  • translucence — the quality of allowing light, but not detailed shapes, to pass through; semitransparent  (ix, 18)
  • travail — painful or laborious effort  (4, 24)
  • trigon — a triangular region or area  (14, 16)
  • trivial — of little value or importance  (7, 12)
  • tumult — confusion or disorder  (4, 8)
  • tyrannous — relating to cruel and oppressive government or rule  (44, 5)
  • tyrant — a cruel, unreasonable, and oppressive ruler  (11, 14)

U-U-U-U-U-U-U-U

  • umbrageous — annoying, offensive, irritating  (24, 9)
  • unalloyed — metal that is pure, or relating to emotions that are complete and unreserved  (41, 10)
  • unbounded — having or appearing to have no limits  (19, 6)
  • uncandid — not truthful, not straightforward, not frank  (44, 41)
  • unfathomable — incapable of being fully explored or understood; incomprehensible  (6, 28; 35, 41; 43, 33)
  • unilluminated — uninspired, commonplace  (6, 2)
  • unimpeachable — not able to be doubted, questioned, or criticized; entirely trustworthy  (7, 27)
  • unruffled — not disordered or disarranged, calm, smooth, placid  (39, 11)
  • unscrupulous — having or showing no moral principles; not honest or fair; unprincipled, unfair  (22, 26)
  • unslaked — not quenched or satisfied  (21, 10)
  • usurp — to take a position of power or importance illegally or by force  (16, 9)
  • usurper — one who takes a position of power or importance illegally or by force  (11, 13)

V-V-V-V-V-V-V-V

  • vague — of uncertain, indefinite, or unclear character or meaning  (11, 36)
  • veneer — an attractive appearance that covers or disguises someone or something’s true nature or feelings  (19, 35)
  • verity — a true principle or belief  (13, 13)
  • voluptuous — relating to or characterized by luxury or sensual pleasure  (5, 2)
  • votary — a person, such as a monk or nun, who has made vows of dedication to a religious work or effort  (ix, 31)
  • vulgar — lacking sophistication or good taste; unrefined; gross, crass  (44, 5)

W-W-W-W-W-W-W-W

  • wayfarer — a person who travels on foot  (5, 1)
  • wily — skilled at gaining an advantage, especially deceitfully  (48, 20)
  • wretched — grim, despicable  (46, 19)

Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z

  • zeal — great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objective; passion  (45, 19)

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