Select Page

vocabularyfarrar ( ** )

The unique vocabulary found in The Life of Christ, by Frederic William Farrar


Frederic William Farrar, in his epic tome entitled “The Life of Christ”, displayed his unparalleled command of the English language in choice of words and phrasing.  I have listed below many of the erudite words that Mr. Farrar used in his book, to the edification and enlightenment of all.  The definition is followed by two numbers, the first being the page number and the second being the line number where the word is used; for example abrogate — repeal or do away with a law, right, or formal agreement; to repudiate, to revoke  (48, 33) means that the word ‘abrogate’ is found on page 48, line 33 of the book.  


A-A-A-A-A-A-A-A                                                                                                      Click here to return to the Main Menu

  • abashed — embarrassed, disconcerted, or ashamed  (191, 7)
  • abatement —  the ending, reduction, subsiding, or lessening of something  (104, 9)
  • abhorrence — a feeling of repulsion; disgusted loathing  (xiv, 27)
  • abject — relating to something bad experienced or present to the maximum degree  (28, 39)
  • abjectly — completely or wholly, usually without pride or dignity  (87, 41)
  • ablution — the act of washing oneself, often for humorous effect; cleansing, bathing  (209, 9; 209, 20; 220, 5)
  • abnegation — the act of renouncing or rejecting something; rejection, refusal  (120, 37)
  • abode — a place of residence; a house or home  (71, 32; 218, 18)
  • abolish — formally put an end to a system, practice, or institution  (120, 4; 210, 3)
  • abominable — very bad or unpleasant; loathsome, detestable  (80, 23)
  • abrogate — repeal or do away with a law, right, or formal agreement; repudiate, revoke  (48, 33; 91, 8; 119, 38)
  • abruptly — suddenly, unexpectedly  (97, 40)
  • abstinence — the fact or practice of restraining oneself from indulging in something, typically alcohol  (59, 20; 162, 32)
  • abstraction — the process of considering something independently of its associations, attributes, or concrete accompaniments  (78, 37; 84, 17)
  • absurd — ridiculous, nonsensical  (15, 41; 216, 31)
  • absurdity — the quality or state of being ridiculous or wildly unreasonable; ridiculousness  (175, 17; 216, 7)
  • abyss — a deep or seemingly bottomless chasm; chasm, gorge  (156, 22; 163, 2)
  • acceding — agree to a demand, request, or treaty; accepting  (100, 9)
  • accord — be harmonious or consistent with; agree, concur  (182, 39)
  • accordant — agreeing or compatible; harmonious  (124, 33)
  • accredited — officially recognized or authorized  (135, 30)
  • accretion — a thing formed or added by gradual growth or increase  (59, 37)
  • accursed — cursed, damned, doomed, condemned  (50, 27; 122, 26; 200, 11)
  • accusation — a charge or claim that someone has done something illegal or wrong; allegation, assertion  (200, 27)
  • acquiescence — the reluctant acceptance of something without protest, concurrence  (45, 15)
  • actuate — cause someone or something to act in a particular way; motivate  (25, 36; 49, 15; 66, 24; 175, 24)
  • acuteness — sharpness, intensity, directness  (77, 25)
  • adder — a small venomous Eurasian snake that has a dark zigzag pattern on its back and bears live young  (55, 11)
  • adhesion — the action or process of sticking to a surface or object  (72, 26)
  • adjudication — the pronouncement of a formal judgment on a disputed matter  (207, 19)
  • adulatory — excessively praising or admiring; flattering, enthusiastic  (187, 19)
  • adulterous — inconstant, untrue, unfaithful, disloyal  (51, 7)
  • advent — the arrival of a notable person, thing, or event; appearance, emergence  (98, 40; 135, 23)
  • adventitious — happening or carried on according to chance rather than design or inherent nature, unintentional  (37, 13; 77, 14)
  • affectation –behavior, speech, or writing that is artificial and designed to impress  (vi, 37)
  • affectionate — displaying gentle feelings of fondness or liking  (118, 35)
  • affecting — touching the emotions; moving  (115, 4)
  • agio — ease, cosiness  (86, 21)
  • agitate — make someone or something troubled, nervous, or disturbed  (4, 20; 181, 14)
  • agitation — a state of anxiety or nervous excitement; disquiet, distress  (84, 22; 187, 5; 193, 9; 212, 10)
  • alabaster — a fine-grained, translucent form of gypsum, typically white, often carved into ornaments  (137, 28; 138, 10)
  • alien — unfamiliar and disturbing or distasteful., unfamiliar, unknown, foreign  (40, 23; 188, 40)
  • allegiance — loyalty or commitment of a subordinate to a superior or of an individual to a group or cause; faithfulness, fidelity  (75, 17; 193, 18)
  • allegorical — symbolic, representative, figurative  (59, 32)
  • allegory — a story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one  (40, 38; 56, 21; 56, 31; 72, 20)
  • alleviation — the removal or elimination of, the lessening of  (77, 28)
  • alienation — the state or experience of being isolated from a group or an activity to which one should belong or in which one should be involved; detachment, estrangement  (108, 13; 147, 40)
  • allude — suggest or call attention to indirectly; hint at; imply, touch on  (40, 30; 62, 36; 92, 20; 107, 37; 140, 39)
  • allurement — the quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or fascinating; attractive  (56, 18)
  • allusion — an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it explicitly; an indirect or passing reference  (41, 1; 41, 26; 41,31; 42, 23; 69, 18; 69, 21; 70, 41; 72, 25; 155, 40; 199, 20)
  • alms — money or food given to poor people; charity, benefaction  (121, 3)
  • amendment — a change usually with the intent to improve, upgrade, or bolster  (201, 8)
  • amicable — having a spirit of friendliness; without serious disagreement or rancor; good-natured  (181, 6)
  • amphitheater — an open circular or oval building with a central space surrounded by tiers of seats for spectators, for the presentation of dramatic or sporting events  (71, 30; 77, 32; 119, 17)
  • analogous — comparable in certain respects, typically in a way which makes clearer the nature of the things compared; parallel, similar  (77, 34; 150, 30)
  • anathema — something or someone that one vehemently dislikes; something abhorrent or repugnant  (78, 24)
  • anecdote — a short amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person  (8, 2; 24, 37; 128, 29)
  • animosity — strong hostility or enmity  (4, 20; 98, 15)
  • annihilate — destroy utterly; obliterate; wipe out  (72, 38; 73, 23; 178, 32)
  • antagonism — active hostility or opposition; friction, enmity  (202, 33)
  • antecedently — in a manner that precedes in time or order; previous or preexisting  (154, 20)
  • antidote — a medicine taken or given to counteract a particular poison; cure, remedy  (147, 15)
  • antiquity – the ancient past, especially the period before the Middle Ages  (155, 17)
  • antithetic — directly opposed or contrasted; mutually incompatible; contrary to  (139, 8)
  • antitype — a person or thing that represents the opposite of someone or something else  (51, 6)
  • antipathy — a deep-seated feeling of dislike; aversion: animus, hatred  (57, 39)
  • apathetic — showing or feeling no interest, enthusiasm, or concern; indifferent, unconcerned  (82, 6)
  • aperture — an opening, hole, or gap; a space or a split  (160, 13)
  • aphorism — a pithy observation that contains a general truth, such as, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”; a saying, maxim, or axiom  (123, 17)
  • apocryphal — of a story or statement of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true  (5, 36; 8, 32; 16, 21; 17, 13; 33, 33; 207, 1)
  • Apollinarian — an adherent of the Christological doctrine that asserted that in Jesus Christ a perfect divine nature in the form of the divine Logos assumed an imperfect human body with the Logos taking the controlling place ordinarily held by the mind  (57, 24)
  • apologist — a person who offers an argument in defense of something controversial  (viii, 17)
  • apostasy — the abandonment or renunciation of a religious or political belief  (51, 26; 114, 4)
  • apostolate — the position or authority of an apostle or a religious leader  (110, 2; 118, 41)
  • appease — pacify or placate someone by acceding to their demands; propitiate  (79, 24)
  • appellation — a name or title, a designation  (24, 21)
  • appositely — appropriately, suitably  (58, 5)
  • approbation — approval, praise, assent  (135, 29)
  • apt — appropriate or suitable in the circumstances; befitting, relevant  (71, 5)
  • arbitrary — based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system  (61, 25)
  • arcade — a covered passageway with arches along one or both sides; a cloister, a portico  (86, 29)
  • architrave — a main beam resting across the tops of columns, specifically the lower third entablature  (83, 34; 85, 1)
  • ardent – enthusiastic or passionate   (116, 41; 132, 40)
  • ardor — enthusiasm or passion; fervor, zeal  (118, 18; 220, 3)
  • arid — having little or no rain; too dry or barren to support vegetation  (55, 2)
  • aright — correctly; properly; accurately  (193, 33)
  • aristocracy — the highest class in certain societies, especially those holding hereditary titles or offices  (37, 37)
  • arraigned — called or brought before a court to answer a criminal charge; indicted  (89, 21; 195, 18)
  • arrogance — the trait of being haughty, conceited, and egotistical   (49, 22)
  • arrogant — having or revealing an exaggerated sense of one’s own importance or abilities; haughty, conceited  (211, 2)
  • ascendancy — occupation of a position of dominant power or influence; dominance, superiority  (215, 30; 215, 32)
  • ascetic — engaging in severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons  (40, 28; 45, 20; 49, 5; 59, 16; 80, 12; 84, 9; 108, 38; 171, 8)
  • asceticism — severe self-discipline and avoidance of all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons  (49, 21; 49, 28; 79,23; 123, 22; 135, 39; 161, 21; 163, 28; 182, 6; 199, 23)
  • ascriptions — actions of regarding a quality as belonging to someone or something  (118, 32)
  • asperity — harshness of tone or manner  (xiv, 8)
  • aspirant — a person having ambitions to achieve something, typically to follow a particular career  (152, 22)
  • aspirations — a hope or ambition of achieving something; desires, hopes, longings, yearnings  (212, 31)
  • assassin — a murderer of an important person in a surprise attack for political or religious reasons; killer, gunman  (88, 12)
  • assemblage — a collection or gathering of things or people  (59, 21)
  • asseveration — the solemn or emphatic declaration or statement of something  (95, 20; 152, 2)
  • assiduity — constant or close attention to what one is doing  (118, 35)
  • assoilment — the state or act of forgiveness or deliverance from transgression or denunciation  (148, 4)
  • astonishment — great surprise; amazement, shock  (194, 21)
  • astute — shrewd, sharp, having or showing an ability to accurately assess situations or people and turn this to one’s advantage  (215, 20)
  • atheism — disbelief or lack of belief in the existence of God or gods  (48, 31)
  • atheist — a person who disbelieves or lacks belief in the existence of God or gods  (71, 34)
  • atone — make amends or reparation, pay the price for  (165, 20)
  • atrocious — horrifyingly wicked  (18, 19)
  • atrocity — an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury  (20, 7; 21, 3)
  • atrophy — the process or state of wasting away, declining, degenerating  (123, 30; 172, 30; 173, 26)
  • attest — provide or serve as clear evidence of; certify, corroborate  (199, 14)
  • audacious — showing an impudent lack of respect; impertinent  (152, 6; 216, 31)
  • augury — a sign of what will happen in the future; an omen  (67, 33)
  • august — respected and impressive, distinguished  (35, 33)
  • aureate — denoting, made of, or having the color of gold; ornamented, elaborate  (26, 37)
  • austere — severe or strict in manner, attitude, or appearance; stern, harsh  (123, 3)
  • authenticity — legitimacy, validity, genuineness  (60, 4)
  • avarice — extreme greed for wealth or material gain; cupidity  (88, 16; 114, 39)
  • avenge — inflict harm in return for an injury or wrong done previously  (88, 11)
  • avenger — one who inflicts harm in return for an injury or wrong done to oneself or another  (64, 20)
  • avert — prevent or ward off an undesirable occurrence; stave off, ward off  (61, 39; 75, 38)
  • avowedly — as has been asserted, admitted, or stated publicly; openly  (78, 3; 196, 22)
  • awe — a feeling of reverential respect mixed with fear or wonder; amazement, astonishment  (130, 21)
  • awful — awesome, awe-inspiring, impressive  (65, 32)

B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B

  • babbler — one who talks rapidly and continuously in a foolish, excited, or incomprehensible way  (167, 18)
  • bade — requested or required someone to do something  (188, 25)
  • baffle — totally bewilder or perplex; mystify, bemuse  (153, 25; 217, 12)
  • barbarian — an uncultured or brutish person  (19, 35)
  • barren — showing no results or achievements; unproductive; bleak, lifeless  (91, 26; 174, 23; 203, 31)
  • bartering — the action or system of exchanging goods or services without using money; swapping, trading  (86, 38)
  • basalt — a dark, fine-grained volcanic rock that sometimes displays a columnar structure. It is typically composed largely of plagioclase with pyroxene and olivine  (133, 14)
  • base — without moral principles; ignoble; sordid, improper, low  (68, 26; 88, 4; 88, 13; 104, 16)
  • baseness — lack of moral principles; of bad character  (148, 6)
  • basely — in a manner that is without moral principles; in an ignoble manner  (63, 20)
  • bazaar — a market or large shop selling miscellaneous goods  (87, 8)
  • beard — boldly confront or challenge someone or something formidable  (87, 40)
  • bearing — the way one behaves or conducts oneself  (53, 24; 105, 14)
  • beautify — improve the appearance of; adorn, embellish  (187, 15)
  • beatitude — supreme blessedness; benediction  (120, 14)
  • beguile — charm or enchant someone, sometimes in a deceptive way  (33, 20)
  • behoove — it is a duty or responsibility for someone to do something; it is incumbent on  (66, 28)
  • belauded — praised, usually to excess  (121, 6)
  • benefactor — a person who gives money or other help to a person or cause; patron, supporter  (175, 34)
  • beneficence — the doing of good; active goodness or kindness; charity; altruism  (128, 37; 158, 17; 168, 33; 215, 35)
  • beneficent — generous. doing or contributing to good; benevolent, altruistic  (44, 6; 120, 25; 177, 8; 214, 17)
  • benevolence — the character or trait of being generous, giving, altruistic, and kind  (146, 26)
  • benevolent — well meaning and kindly; tender-hearted, charitable  (106, 30)
  • bequeath — to pass something on or leave something to someone else; hand down, leave to  (96, 15)
  • besetting — troubling or threatening persistently; plaguing, beleaguering  (85, 23; 182, 12)
  • bestial — savagely cruel and depraved  (113, 5)
  • betoken — be a sign of; indicate, to warn  (51, 4)
  • betray — treacherously reveal secrets or information; divulge, leak  (92, 7)
  • bewilderment — a state of confusion or being perplexed  (58, 6)
  • bier — a movable frame on which a coffin or a corpse is placed before burial or cremation or on which it is carried to the grave  (21, 25; 130, 21)
  • bigot — a person who is obstinately or unreasonably attached to a belief, opinion, or faction, especially one who is prejudiced against or antagonistic toward a person or people on the basis of their membership of a particular group  (91, 30)
  • bigoted — obstinately or unreasonably attached to a belief, opinion, or faction, in particular prejudiced against or antagonistic toward a person or people on the basis of their membership of a particular group; prejudiced, biased  (105, 20)
  • bituminous — of, containing, or of the nature of bitumen, which is a black coal that burns with much smoke  (55, 4; 80, 21)
  • blameless — innocent of wrongdoing, guiltless  (53, 12)
  • blaspheme — to speak irreverently of God, or divine or sacred things  (218, 3)
  • blasphemer — one who speaks irreverently of God or sacred things  (179, 1)
  • blaspheming — speaking irreverently about God or sacred things  (58, 4)
  • blasphemous — sacrilegious against God or sacred things; profane, vulgar  (27, 10; 208, 21; 216, 5)
  • blasphemy — the act or offense of speaking sacrilegiously about God or sacred things; profane talk  (199, 17; 216, 14; 216, 31)
  • blatant — bad behavior displayed openly and unashamedly; glaring, obvious  (167, 4)
  • blaze — a conspicuous display or outburst of something; eruption, flare-up  (190, 3)
  • blazoned — displayed prominently or vividly; boldly exhibited  (127, 7)
  • blight — a thing that spoils or damages something; an affliction, a scourge  (123, 30)
  • bliss — perfect happiness; great joy; ecstasy  (133, 29)
  • blushing — red in the face from shyness, embarrassment, or shame; pink or pale red  (74, 18)
  • boisterous — wild or stormy; gusting, blustery  (190, 17)
  • boorish — rough and bad-mannered; coarse; uncouth, rude  (106, 7)
  • boundless — unlimited, immense, without boundaries  (95, 25)
  • brawny — physically strong; muscular  (118, 28)
  • brazen — bold and without shame, or made of brass  (28, 23; 209, 25)
  • breathless — short of breath or appearing this way because of excitement or other strong feelings  (88, 22)
  • brevity — concise and exact use of words in writing or speech  (xii, 6; 76, 19; 131, 1; 135, 15; 213, 8)
  • brigand — a member of a gang that ambushes and robs people in forests and mountains  (11, 20; 115, 25)
  • broider — to ornament with embroidery or cloth decorations  (23, 31; 142, 19)
  • brooding — showing deep unhappiness of thought; appearing darkly menacing  (90, 17)
  • brutality — savage physical violence; great cruelty; viciousness  (133, 12; 133, 15)
  • buffeted — battered repeatedly and violently; smashed  (190, 6)
  • bustling — full of activity; busy, teeming  (87, 7)
  • buzzed — made or making a low, continuous humming sound  (103, 40)
  • byssus — a fine textile fiber and fabric of flax  (143, 38)

C-C-C-C-C-C-C-C

  • cabalistic — relating to or associated with mystical interpretation or esoteric doctrine  (41, 13)
  • callosity — a hardening, a thickening; obstinacy  (49, 1)
  • callow —  inexperienced and immature; naïve, green  (43, 6)
  • calumniators — those who make false and defamatory statements about someone or something  (220, 19)
  • calumny — a false and slanderous statement, often designed to damage another’s reputation  (143, 3; 145, 39; 160, 28; 199, 26; 216, 20; 218, 31)
  • candid — truthful and straightforward; frank  (vii, 31; 15, 33; 72, 4; 107, 20)
  • candor — the quality of being open and honest in expression; frankness  (viii, 16; 91, 32; 92, 13)
  • cant — hypocritical and sanctimonious talk, typically of a moral, religious, or political nature  (220, 27)
  • capital — excellent, important, wonderful  (53, 4; 205, 12)
  • capricious — given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behavior; fickle, unstable  (62, 34)
  • captious — tending to find fault or raise petty objections  (viii, 2)
  • captivate — attract and hold the interest and attention of; charm  (53, 21)
  • caravanserai — an inn with a central courtyard for travelers in the desert regions of Asia or North Africa  (5, 8; 85, 3)
  • cardinal — of the greatest importance; fundamental, essential  (52, 39)
  • carnal — relating to physical, especially sexual, needs and activities; sensuous, erotic, lustful  (93, 17; 223, 7)
  • caste — any class or group of people who inherit exclusive privileges or are perceived as socially distinct  (91, 29; 200, 8)
  • catacomb — an underground cemetery consisting of a subterranean gallery with recesses for tombs, as constructed by the ancient Romans  (55, 32)
  • catastrophe — an event causing great and often sudden damage or suffering; a disaster; calamity  (81, 12; 188, 12)
  • catechize — instruct someone in the principles of Christian religion by means of question and answer, typically by using a catechism; put questions to or interrogate someone   (222, 1)
  • ceaseless — without end, continuous, never-ending, perpetual  (193, 10)
  • celebrity — the state of being well known; fame, renown  (187, 38)
  • celestial — belonging or relating to heaven; saintly, divine  (68, 30; 73, 18)
  • celibacy — the state of abstaining from marriage and sexual relations  (48, 26; 79, 24)
  • censorious — severely critical of others; disapproving, condemnatory  (84, 20)
  • centurion — the commander of a century (100 soldiers) in the ancient Roman army  (127, 26)
  • ceremonial — relating to or used for formal events of a religious or public nature; official  (138, 25; 178, 33)
  • chaff — worthless things; trash, waste, garbage  (52, 35)
  • chafferer — someone who haggles about the price of something  (87, 35)
  • chastened — disciplined, punished, restrained  (72, 19)
  • chialist — one who believes in a coming millennium, especially of prosperity or justice  (197, 3)
  • chrysolite — a yellowish-green or brownish variety of olivine, used as a gemstone  (64, 21)
  • circumvent — find a way around an obstacle; overcome a problem or difficulty, typically in a clever and surreptitious way  (208, 32)
  • cistern — a tank for storing water, especially one supplying taps or as part of a flushing toilet  (217, 16)
  • citron — a shrubby Asian tree that bears large fruits similar to lemons, but with flesh that is less acid and peels that are thicker and more fragrant  (182, 38)
  • civility — formal politeness and courtesy in behavior or speech  (221, 27)
  • clad — clothed, dressed, attired  (57, 10)
  • clamor — a loud and confused noise, especially that of people shouting vehemently; uproar, tumult  (165, 39)
  • climax — the most intense, exciting, or important point of something; a culmination or apex  (104, 33; 132, 12; 201, 2)
  • cloak — something serving to hide or disguise something  (197, 4)
  • cloven — split or divided in two  (54, 21)
  • clutch — grasp or seize something tightly or eagerly  (154, 34)
  • cobalt — a deep blue pigment containing cobalt and aluminum oxides  (50, 26)
  • cogency — the quality of being clear, logical, and convincing; lucidity  (120, 11)
  • colossal — extremely large, massive, enormous  (47, 3; 64, 13; 71, 30; 81, 8; 88, 38)
  • commemoration — remembrance, typically expressed in a ceremony  (172, 9)
  • communions — a relationship of recognition and acceptance between Christian churches or denominations, or between individual Christians or Christian communities and a church (signified by a willingness to give or receive the Eucharist)  (196, 11)
  • compendium — a collection of concise but detailed information about a particular subject; collection, compilation  (209, 26)
  • competent — having the necessary ability, knowledge, or skill to do something successfully; capable, adept  (102, 39)
  • composite — made up of various parts or elements; blended, mixed  (84, 40)
  • comprehension — the action or capability of understanding something; grasp, grip  (101, 8)
  • compulsion — the action or state of forcing or being forced to do something; constraint; coercion, duress  (114, 7)
  • compulsory — obligatory, mandatory, required  (79, 23)
  • concede — admit that something is true or valid after first denying or resisting it; acknowledge  (123, 32)
  • conceivable — capable of being imagined or grasped mentally; plausible, tenable  (196, 11)
  • conciliate — stop (someone) from being angry or discontented; placate; pacify; appease, mollify  (199, 28)
  • conciliatory –intended or likely to placate or pacify or appease  (170, 24)
  • concomitant — naturally accompanying or associated; related, connected  (132, 16)
  • concourse — a large open area inside or in front of a public building, as in an airport or train station, or a crowd or assemblage of people  (111,38; 173, 17)
  • condemnation — the expression of very strong disapproval; censure; denunciation, damnation  (93, 25; 132,37)
  • condemnatory — disapproving, censuring, denouncing, damning  (211, 10)
  • condescend — to act in a patronizing, snobbish, or arrogant way  (217, 29)
  • condescending — having or showing a feeling of patronizing superiority; snobbish, supercilious  (136, 22: 176, 33)
  • condole — express sympathy for someone; grieve with  (180, 13)
  • conducive — making a certain situation or outcome likely or possible  (42, 41)
  • confessedly — by one’s own admission  (100, 21)
  • confirmation — verification, proof, endorsement  (7, 9)
  • conflagration — an extensive fire which destroys a great deal of land or property; an inferno  (81, 13)
  • conform — comply with rules, standards, or laws; observe, obey  (75, 22)
  • conformable — similar in form or nature; consistent  (217, 31)
  • conformation – the shape or structure of something  (115, 23)
  • congealed — having become semisolid, especially on cooling  (40, 39)
  • conjecture — to form an opinion or supposition about something on the basis of incomplete information  (187, 40)
  • conjecture — an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information  (7, 10; 8, 8; 12, 34; 14, 12; 35, 17; 42, 25; 74, 32; 106, 25; 117, 16; 129, 20)
  • connoisseur — an expert judge in matters of taste; a pundit  (96, 38)
  • connote — imply or suggest an idea or feeling in addition to the literal or primary meaning  (66, 6)
  • conscience — an inner feeling or voice viewed as acting as a guide to the rightness or wrongness of one’s behavior; moral sense  (98, 5)
  • consciousness — the awareness or perception of something by a person  (109, 28)
  • consecrated — having been made or declared sacred  (86, 33; 102, 18)
  • consign — assign; commit decisively or permanently  (210, 32)
  • consolation — the comfort received by a person after a loss or disappointment; sympathy, solace  (48, 21)
  • consolatory — comforting, reassuring  (202, 4)
  • consort — a wife, husband, or companion, in particular the spouse of a reigning monarch  (180, 35)
  • conspicuous — standing out so as to be clearly visible, attracting notice or attention  (47, 1; 107, 10; 115, 21; 127, 35; 180, 6)
  • conspiracy — a secret plan by a group to do something unlawful or harmful; a sinister plot or scheme  (220, 21)
  • conspirator — a person who takes part in a conspiracy or a devious plot or scheme  (179, 13)
  • constitution — the composition, structure, or makeup of something  (174, 2)
  • constitutional — relating to an established set of principles governing a state; legal, lawful, legitimate  (92, 1)
  • constraint — a limitation or restriction; a curb, a check  (128, 33; 189, 22)
  • construed — interpreted in a particular way; understood  (203, 21; 205, 15)
  • consummate — showing a high degree of skill and flair; complete or perfect; ultimate, quintessential  (112, 37)
  • consummation — the point at which something is complete or finalized  (105, 9)
  • contagion — the spreading of a harmful idea or practice  (142, 37)
  • contemplative — expressing or involving prolonged thought; pensive, reflective  (67,  41; 73, 30; 117, 21)
  • contemplativeness — being in a state of prolonged thought, being pensive and reflective  (118, 6)
  • contempt — the feeling that a person or a thing is beneath consideration, worthless, or deserving scorn  (138, 23; 161, 13; 220, 17)
  • contemptible — deserving hatred or derision; despicable  (132, 13; 176, 13; 220, 26)
  • contemptuous — showing disdain and derision; scornful  (vii, 31; 13, 12; 48, 18; 83, 39; 122, 5; 135, 31; 138, 29; 205, 35)
  • contemptuously — in a manner that shows disdain, derision, and scorn  (114, 2)
  • contentious — given to arguing or provoking argument; argumentative, quarrelsome  (44, 41)
  • contrary — opposite in nature, direction, or meaning; opposing, opposed  (190, 17)
  • contrite — feeling or expressing remorse or penitence; affected by guilt  (139, 12)
  • contrition — the state of feeling remorseful and penitent  (125, 35)
  • convivial — friendly, lively, and enjoyable; genial  (171, 23)
  • correlative — having a mutual relationship; corresponding  (174, 13)
  • corroding — being destroyed or weakened gradually; falling apart  (49, 10)
  • cosmic — relating to the universe or cosmos, especially as distinct from the earth; extraterrestrial  (155, 6)
  • countenance — a person’s face or facial expression; facial features  (139, 40)
  • countenance — approve of, give support to  (146, 1; 220, 11; 220, 15)
  • counterfeit — a fraudulent imitation of something else; a forgery  (202, 34)
  • courtier –a person who attends a royal court as a companion or adviser to the king or queen  (5, 1; 106, 23; 107, 11; 124, 20; 128, 2; 182, 10)
  • covetous — having or showing a great desire to possess something belonging to someone else; greedy, rapacious  (222, 31)
  • cow — to break, force into submission, overpower  (132, 31)
  • cower — crouch down in fear; cringe, shrink  (182, 10)
  • crackbrained — extremely foolish; crazy; idiotic  (129, 4)
  • crag — a steep or rugged cliff or rock face  (119, 34)
  • credibility — the quality of being trusted and believed in; trustworthiness, character  (153, 40)
  • credulity — a tendency to be too ready to believe that something is real or true  (15, 34)
  • credulous — having or showing too great a readiness to believe things; gullible  (154, 18; 215, 28)
  • crimson — of a rich deep red color inclining to purple  (9, 1)
  • crude — in a natural or raw state; not yet processed or refined  (60, 6)
  • crypt — an underground room or vault beneath a church, used as a chapel or burial place  (2, 11)
  • culminate — reach a climax or point of highest development  (180, 39)
  • cumber — hamper or hinder someone or something; obstruct  (72, 17)
  • cunning — having or showing skill in achieving one’s ends by deceit or evasion; crafty, wily  (132, 16)
  • cynic — a person who believes that people are motivated purely by self-interest rather than acting for honorable or unselfish reasons; a pessimist  (49, 22)
  • cynical — believing that people are motivated by self-interest; distrustful of human sincerity or integrity  (128, 40)

D-D-D-D-D-D-D-D

  • dashed — struck or flung somewhere with great force, especially so as to have a destructive effect; hurled, flung  (62, 23)
  • daunt — make someone feel intimidated or apprehensive  (53, 29)
  • dauntless — showing fearlessness and determination  (51, 5; 88, 12; 105, 14; 105, 28; 132, 27; 170, 25; 181, 36)
  • dazzle — amaze or overwhelm (someone) with a particular impressive quality; overpower, overcome  (151, 38)
  • death-knell — the tolling of a bell to mark someone’s death; the end of, demise  (211, 12)
  • debase — reduce something or someone in quality or value; degrade, denounce  (220, 19)
  • debris — scattered pieces of waste or remains; detritus, litter  (122, 13)
  • decadent — characterized by or reflecting a state of moral or cultural decline  (vii, 19)
  • decimated — drastically reduced in the strength or effectiveness of something  (19, 8)
  • decipherable — able to be understood, interpreted, or identified  (38, 25)
  • decisive — having or showing the ability to make decisions quickly and effectively; resolute, firm  (129, 11)
  • decisively — in a manner exhibiting the ability to make quick and effective decisions; firmly, resolutely  (194, 19)
  • declivity — a downward slope  (23, 1; 80, 30; 133, 22)
  • decorum — behavior in keeping with good taste and propriety; propriety  (98, 2)
  • decrepit — worn out or ruined because of age or neglect; infirm  (ix, 12; 71, 23)
  • decrepitude — the state of being decrepit, frail, weak, infirm  (11, 7; 81, 40)
  • defective — imperfect or faulty; flawed, shoddy  (123, 35)
  • deference — humble submission and respect  (4, 6)
  • defiance — open resistance; bold disobedience; opposition, disobedience  (80, 19)
  • defiant — resistant, unwilling, obstinate  (71, 34)
  • defile — a steep-sided narrow gorge or passage; originally one requiring troops to march in single file  (51, 38)
  • degenerate — decline or deteriorate physically, mentally, or morally  (57, 30)
  • degradation — the condition or process of degrading or being degraded; humiliation, shame  (48, 32; 71, 32; 82:1; 113, 7; 141, 25; 148, 1; 155, 11; 201, 20)
  • degrade — treat or regard someone or something with contempt or disrespect; demean, debase  (121, 21)
  • degraded — reduced in quality; inferior (48, 19; 87, 6; 109, 20; 137, 32; 183, 23)
  • degrading — causing a loss of self-respect; humiliating; shameful, mortifying  (68, 13; 183, 5)
  • deified — worshiped, regarded, or treated someone or something as a god; venerated  (63, 35)
  • dejection — a sad and depressed state; low spirits; despondency  (162, 15)
  • delation — the handing down of a person to a lesser court  (176, 13)
  • delineation — the action of describing or portraying something precisely; depiction, representation  (201, 11)
  • delirium — an acutely disturbed state of mind that occurs in fever, intoxication, and other disorders and is characterized by restlessness, illusions, and incoherence of thought and speech  (21, 22; 110, 35; 128, 36; 183, 23)
  • deluge — a heavy fall of rain or a flood  (81, 13)
  • demoniac — of, like, or characteristic of a demon or demons, fiendish, satanic  (17, 22; 109, 19; 110, 16; 110, 21; 110, 27; 155, 38; 156, 33; 199, 30; 214, 38; 215, 36; 217, 27)
  • demoniacal — relating to or characteristic of a demon or evil spirit  (155, 16)
  • demonstrably — in a way that is clearly apparent or capable of being logically proved  (123, 34)
  • denounce — publicly declare to be wrong or evil; criticize, condemn  (41, 8; 78, 14))
  • denunciation — public condemnation of someone or something  (ix, 7; 209, 5; 215, 37)
  • denunciative — leaning toward public condemnation of someone or something  (157, 40)
  • depositary — a person to whom something is lodged in trust  (4, 17)
  • depraved — morally corrupt; wicked; perverted, deviant  (182, 39)
  • deprecating — expressing disapproval; disapproving  (220, 15)
  • deprecatory — in a manner that expresses disapproval; disapproving  (221, 2)
  • depreciatory —  tending to decrease or cause a decrease in value  (134, 34)
  • deputation — appointment to an office or function, or an envoy of officials carrying out an official obligation  (65, 22; 127, 24; 164, 6)
  • derivative — something that is based on another source; by-product, spinoff  (205, 19)
  • derogatory — showing a critical or disrespectful attitude; belittling, disparaging  (67, 32)
  • desecrated — violated, disrespected, scorned, abused  (141, 35)
  • despairing — showing the loss of all hope  (188, 21)
  • despicable — deserving hatred and contempt, loathsome, hateful  (11, 25; 71, 2; 184, 18)
  • despised — hated, detested, loathed, abhorred   (87, 39; 92, 8)
  • despondency — a state of low spirits caused by loss of hope or courage; discouragement  (132, 2)
  • despondent — disheartened, discouraged, dispirited, low-spirited  (112, 24)
  • despot — a ruler or other person who holds absolute power, typically one who exercises it in a cruel or oppressive way  (18, 22)
  • despotism — a setting or situation where a ruler or other person holds absolute power, often exercising it in cruel and oppressive ways  (123, 23)
  • desecration — violation, pollution, contamination  (87, 23)
  • destined — certain to meet a particular fate, fated, predestined  (47, 35; 190, 16)
  • destitute — without the basic necessities of life; impoverished, indigent  (173, 25)
  • detestation — intense dislike, loathing, hatred  (127, 33)
  • devoid — entirely lacking or free from  (4, 37; 122, 12; 220, 39)
  • devout — totally committed to a cause or belief; dedicated, devoted  (127, 41; 210, 34)
  • diaphanous — relating to a low-pitched fog signal operated by compressed air, characterized by the “grunt” that ends each note  (47, 6)
  • didactic — intended to teach, particularly in having moral instruction as an ulterior motive, instructive, instructional  (213, 21)
  • didrachma — a Greek silver coin worth two drachmas  (146, 16)
  • dimpling — forming or showing a dimpled or notched surface  (81, 15)
  • dire — extremely serious or urgent; terrible, frightful  (58, 6)
  • dirge — a lament for the dead, especially one forming part of a funeral rite  (33, 6)
  • disaffection — a state or feeling of being dissatisfied with the people in authority and no longer willing to support them; discontent, frustration  (198, 24)
  • disapprobation — strong disapproval, typically on moral grounds  (104, 37)
  • discomfiture — uneasiness, embarrassment  (222, 33)
  • discontent — lack of contentment; dissatisfaction with one’s circumstances; dissatisfaction  (52, 7; 197, 9)
  • discontinuity — a sharp difference of characteristics between parts of something  (6, 25)
  • discountenance — the act or stance of refusing to approve of something  (148, 20; 161, 20; 186, 18; 213, 5)
  • discourse — written or spoken communication or debate; discussion, conversation  (192, 24)
  • discredit — loss or lack of reputation or respect; dishonor, disrepute  (200, 1)
  • discreditably — in a manner that would bring harm to a reputation  (171, 22)
  • discrepancy — a lack of compatibility or similarity between two or more facts  (7, 31)
  • discriminate — recognize a distinction; differentiate  (58, 25)
  • disdain — the feeling that someone or something is unworthy of one’s consideration or respect; contempt, scorn  (24, 21; 200, 14)
  • disentangle — free (something or someone) from an entanglement or dilemma; extricate  (58, 7)
  • disgrace — loss of reputation or respect as the result of a dishonorable action; shame, ignominy  (75, 39)
  • disheveled — untidy; disordered; unkempt, scruffy  (138, 8; 138, 12; 139, 17)
  • dislike — a feeling of distaste or hostility  (51, 13)
  • dispelled — to have made a doubt, feeling, or belief disappear; to have banished  (71, 25; 72, 6; 223, 6)
  • dispirited — having lost enthusiasm and hope; disheartened; discouraged  (49, 7)
  • dispossessed — deprived of property, or other possessions  (109, 36)
  • dispossessing — depriving someone of land, property, or other possessions  (119, 15)
  • disquisition — a long or elaborate essay or discussion on a particular subject; essay, dissertation  (94, 17)
  • disseminate — to spread something, especially information, widely; to distribute  (13, 23)
  • dissemination — the spreading or distributing of something  (127, 11; 168, 40)
  • dissimulate — conceal or disguise one’s thoughts, feelings, or character  (11, 17)
  • dissipate — vanish, evaporate, disappear or cause to disappear  (215, 18)
  • dissolute — lax in morals; licentious; decadent, profligate  (143, 31; 180, 23; 181, 12; 183, 20; 184, 23)
  • dissolution — the closing down or dismissal of an assembly, partnership, or official body; cessation, conclusion, end  (91, 12; 215, 7)
  • distasteful — causing dislike or disgust; offensive; unpleasant  (4, 13; 90, 40)
  • distemper — to disrupt or disturb, to rankle  (218, 17)
  • distinction — excellence that sets someone or something apart from others; significance  (221, 1)
  • divergence — the process or state of separating, going different directions; branching, forking, parting  (68, 15)
  • divinity — godliness, the state or quality of being divine or godlike  (58, 10)
  • docile — ready to accept control or instruction; submissive, compliant, obedient  (136, 17)
  • dog — to follow someone or their movements closely and persistently; to stalk, to shadow  (168, 9; 205, 3)
  • dogmatic — inclined to lay down principles as incontrovertibly true; opinionated, highly assertive  (8, 35; 44, 40; 59, 30; 122, 1)
  • doleful — unhappy, depressed, mournful  (133, 16)
  • domination — the exercise of control or influence over someone or something, or the state of being so controlled  (208, 19)
  • dotage — the period of life in which a person is old and weak; the declining years  (48, 30)
  • downright — utter; complete, total, absolute  (51, 36; 219, 24)
  • draught — the fish taken at one drawing; a catch; also, a single act of drinking or inhaling  (112, 30; 148, 17)
  • dread — greatly feared; dreadful; frightful and alarming   (130, 24; 187, 6)
  • dregs — the most worthless part or parts of something; scum, refuse  (79, 35; 114, 12; 133, 20)
  • dross — something regarded as worthless; rubbish; detritus  (64, 12; 133, 28)
  • drovers — shepherds, herdsmen  (86, 38)
  • duality — the quality of having two natures, theorems, or concepts simultaneously, often in opposition to each other  (109, 28)
  • dubious — hesitating or doubting; not to be relied on, suspect  (98, 24; 122, 36; 123, 18; 161, 28)
  • dupe — one who has been deceived, a victim, a pawn  (178, 5; 184, 12)

E-E-E-E-E-E-E-E

  • earnestness — resulting from or showing sincere and intense conviction; soberness, seriousness  (92, 35)
  • eccentricity — an oddity or peculiarity relating to one’s conduct  (128, 38)
  • eclectic — deriving ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources  (40, 13)
  • ecstasy — an overwhelming feeling of great happiness or joyful excitement; rapture, elation  (80, 12)
  • ecstatic — feeling or expressing overwhelming happiness or joyful excitement; enraptured  (118, 32)
  • edification — the instruction or improvement of a person morally or intellectually  (50, 39; 57, 4)
  • Edomite — a member of an ancient people living in Edom, a region south of the Dead Sea, in biblical times, traditionally believed to be descended from Esau  (183, 7)
  • effectual — successful in producing a desired or intended result; effective; efficacious  (128, 15; 173, 38)
  • effeminate — relating to a man who has or shows characteristics regarded as typical of a woman; unmanly, effete, unmanly  (38, 4; 83, 39; 117, 30; 132, 27)
  • effete — no longer capable of effective action; weak, feeble  (13, 1; 117, 40)
  • efficacious —  successful in producing a desired or intended result; effective; constructive, productive  (215, 5)
  • efficacy — the ability to produce a desired or intended result; effectiveness  (154, 36)
  • efflorescence —  a flowering of, budding of; the state of losing moisture and turning to a fine powder on exposure to air  (50, 28; 209, 4)
  • egotistical — excessively conceited or absorbed in oneself; self-centered  (152, 10)
  • egregious — outstandingly bad; shocking; appalling, horrific  (184, 12; 223, 1)
  • ejaculations — statements said quickly or suddenly, often without forethought  (109, 30)
  • elaborate — involving many carefully arranged parts or details; detailed and complicated in design and planning; intricate, detailed  (109, 4)
  • elaborated — developed or presented a theory, policy, or system in detail  (100, 26)
  • electric — having or producing a sudden sense of thrilling excitement; exciting, dramatic  (69, 37; 73, 25)
  • elicited — evoked or drawn out (a response, answer, or fact) from someone in reaction to one’s own actions or questions  (94, 18)
  • eloquence — fluent or persuasive speaking or writing, expressiveness  (25, 13; 123, 12; 128, 40; 152, 6)
  • emaciated — abnormally thin or weak, especially because of illness or a lack of food  (49, 28)
  • emancipate — set free, especially from legal, social, or political restrictions  (31, 9)
  • emancipated — to have been set free from legal, social, or political restrictions  (71, 27)
  • embalm — preserve a corpse from decay, originally with spices and now usually by arterial injection of a preservative  (40, 3)
  • embittered — angry or resentful at having been treated unfairly, resentful, antagonistic  (188, 13)
  • embodied — included or contained as a constituent part  (163, 14)
  • emboldened — given the courage or confidence to do something or to behave in a certain way; heartened, strengthened  (138, 5)
  • embroidered — decorated with patterns sewn on with thread, usually referring to cloth  (88, 40)
  • emerald — a bright green color like that of an emerald  (81, 3)
  • eminence — fame or recognized superiority, especially within a particular sphere or profession; also, a piece of elevated ground  (51, 16; 109, 2)
  • eminent — famous and respected within a particular sphere or profession  (60, 8; 92, 17)
  • eminently — to a notable degree; very; extremely  (42, 41)
  • emir — a title of various Muslim, mainly Arab, rulers  (70, 36)
  • emphatic — showing or giving emphasis; expressing something forcibly and clearly  (53, 16; 65, 25; 195, 35; 204, 12; 211, 25)
  • empyrean — heaven, in particular the highest part of heaven  (57, 24)
  • emulative — of a nature to match or surpass a person or achievement, typically by imitation  (82, 29)
  • encroachment — intrusion on a person’s territory or rights; an intrusion  (64, 14; 95, 12)
  • encumbered — restricted or burdened in such a way that free action or movement is difficult; hampered, impeded  (50, 5; 84, 38; 109, 3)
  • endowment — a quality or ability possessed or inherited by someone  (58, 10)
  • enervating –causing one to feel drained of energy or vitality; exhausting, fatiguing  (81, 34)
  • enervation — a feeling of being drained of energy or vitality; fatigue; exhaustion, lassitude  (82, 6)
  • enfeebled — made weak, feeble, or ineffectual  (174, 2)
  • enigma — a person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling, or difficult to understand  (ix, 33)
  • enjoin — prescribe an action or attitude to be performed or adopted  (59, 17; 126, 21; 126, 26; 144, 4)
  • enkindled –set on fire; aroused; inspired  (88, 7)
  • enmity — the state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something; friction, animosity  (181, 40; 198, 22; 204, 20; 208, 23)
  • ennoble — lend greater dignity or nobility of character to; honor, exalt  (80, 3; 84, 12)
  • enraptured — to have given intense pleasure or joy to  (122, 28; 183, 3)
  • ensample — an example; a pattern or model worthy of imitation  (57, 36; 58, 41)
  • enshrined — preserved (a right, tradition, or idea) in a form that ensures it will be protected and respected  (57, 24; 69, 14; 89,29)
  • ensued — happened or occurred  (65, 8)
  • entreat — to send forth an earnest and humble request; to plead, to petition  (156, 7)
  • entreating — sending forth an earnest and humble request; pleading, petitioning  (128, 1)
  • entreaty — an earnest or humble request; a plea, a petition  (110, 6; 125, 17; 201,31; 212, 17; 213, 33)
  • ephemerid — a table or data file giving the calculated positions of a celestial object at regular intervals throughout a period  (38, 36)
  • ephod — a sleeveless garment worn by Jewish priests  (42, 37; 143, 40)
  • epicurean — devoted to sensual enjoyment, especially that derived from fine food and drink; hedonistic  (40, 24; 49, 23)
  • epilepsy — a neurological disorder marked by sudden recurrent episodes of sensory disturbance, loss of consciousness, or convulsions, associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain  (110, 36)
  • epiphany — a manifestation of a divine or supernatural being; a moment of sudden revelation or insight; the manifestation of Christ on earth  (10, 32)
  • epitome — a person or thing that is a perfect example of a particular quality or type; paragon, personification  (108, 32; 146, 23)
  • epitaph — a phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone  (42, 4; 117, 3)
  • epoch — a period of time in history or a person’s life, typically one marked by notable events or particular characteristics  (18, 26; 48, 23)
  • eremite — a Christian hermit or recluse; a recluse  (50, 14; 55, 27; 80, 10; 181, 24)
  • erroneous — wrong, incorrect, mistaken  (123, 35)
  • erudite — having or showing great knowledge or learning  (vi, 39; 122, 4)
  • erudition — the quality of having or showing great knowledge or learning; scholarship  (40, 10)
  • escarpment — a long, steep slope, especially one at the edge of a plateau or separating areas of land at different heights  (81, 25; 105, 6)
  • esoteric — intended for or likely to be understood by only a small number of people with a specialized knowledge or interest; abstruse, arcane, obscure  (123, 36)
  • espionage — the practice of spying or of using spies, typically by governments to obtain political and military information  (204, 39)
  • esteem — respect and admire; to hold in high regard  (63, 20)
  • estimation — a rough calculation of the value, number, quantity, or extent of something  (104, 32)
  • eulogy — a speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly, typically someone who has just died  (131, 23; 134, 37; 135, 11; 185, 2)
  • euphemism — a mild or indirect word or expression substituted for one considered to be too harsh or blunt  (52, 5)
  • evanescent — soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing  (13, 33)
  • evangelic — of or according to the teaching of the gospel or the Christian religion  (26, 25)
  • evidential — of or providing evidence  (ix, 26)
  • evoke — bring or recall to the conscious mind; elicit  (114, 22)
  • evolve — develop gradually, especially from a simple to a more complex form  (191, 38)
  • ewer — a large jug with a wide mouth, formerly used for carrying water for someone to wash in  (28, 23)
  • exacerbation — an acute increase in the severity of a problem, illness, or bad situation.  (203, 25)
  • exaltation — a feeling or state of extreme happiness; elation, rapture  (78, 10; 99, 30)
  • exasperation — a feeling of intense irritation or annoyance; chagrin, vexation   (127, 39; 162, 36; 178, 19)
  • exclusiveness — the state of restricting or limiting to the person, group, or area concerned  (200, 14; 202, 37)
  • excruciating — intensely painful, mentally distressing  (19, 6)
  • exegesis — critical explanation or interpretation of a text, especially of scripture  (14, 9; 56, 34;  197, 21)
  • exhalations — expirations of air from the lungs; also, statements, expressions, pronouncements  (192, 20)
  • exigencies — urgent needs or demands; necessities, essentials  (78, 16)
  • exile — the state of being barred from one’s native country, typically for political or punitive reasons; banishment  (186, 25)
  • exorcism — the expulsion or attempted expulsion of a supposed evil spirit from a person or place  (140, 38; 215, 4; 216, 9; 217, 19)
  • expectant — having or showing an excited feeling that something is about to happen, especially something pleasant and interesting  (164, 16; 188, 25)
  • expedient — convenient and practical although possibly improper or immoral  (60, 36)
  • expeditiously — with speed and efficiency  (74, 9)
  • expositor — a person or thing that explains complicated ideas or theories  (56, 28)
  • exquisite — extremely beautiful and, typically, delicate, elegant, superb, transcendent  (200, 38; 213, 20)
  • extant — still in existence; surviving, remaining, abiding  (29, 21)
  • extortions — the practice of obtaining something, especially money, through force or threats  (51, 24; 52, 6)
  • extravagance — excessive elaborateness of style, speech, or action  (180, 8)
  • extravagant — elaborate, stylish, ornate  (210, 20)
  • extremity — the furthest point or limit of something; limit, boundary, border  (190, 22)
  • exult — feel or show triumphant elation or jubilation; rejoice exceedingly  (148, 25; 177, 26)
  • exultation — a feeling of triumphant elation or jubilation; rejoicing; jubilation  (157, 9)

F-F-F-F-F-F-F-F

  • fabled — well known for being of great quality or rarity; famous; celebrated  (64, 19)
  • fabulist — a person who composes or relates fables, a storyteller  (26, 13)
  • facile —  appearing neat and comprehensive only by ignoring the true complexities of an issue; superficial, simplistic  (51, 26)
  • faction — a small organized dissenting group within a larger one, especially in politics; coterie, clique  (200, 15)
  • fain — pleased or willing under the circumstances (49, 24; 159, 9; 174, 7)
  • falsification — a fabrication, an alteration, a changing  (95, 18)
  • falsity — the fact of being untrue, incorrect, or insincere  (52, 9)
  • fanatic —  person filled with excessive and single-minded zeal, especially for an extreme religious or political cause; a zealot, an extremist  (49, 25; 51, 25; 91, 29)
  • fanaticism — the quality of being zealous, extreme, or militant  (96, 8)
  • fancied — imagined, thought of, surprised by  (137, 37)
  • fancy — as a verb, to feel a desire or liking for  (8, 35)
  • fastidious — very attentive to and concerned about accuracy and detail; punctilious, meticulous  (72, 6)
  • fastidiousness — the tendency to be very attentive to and concerned about accuracy and detail  (96, 9)
  • fastness — a secure refuge, especially a place well protected by natural features  (181, 5)
  • fathom — to understand, to comprehend, to make sense of   (73, 13)
  • favoritism — the practice of giving unfair preferential treatment to one person or group at the expense of another; partiality  (202, 38)
  • fawning — displaying exaggerated flattery or affection; obsequious  (19, 20; 221, 37)
  • feeble — lacking physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness; wasted, frail  (181, 30)
  • feebleness — the situation of lacking physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness  (177, 6)
  • feebly — in a manner that demonstrates the lack of physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness   (169, 11)
  • felon — a person who has been convicted of a crime, typically one involving violence, regarded as more serious than a misdemeanor  (71, 26)
  • ferocity — the state of being barbarous, violent, cruel, or savage  (19, 33; 55, 17)
  • fervid — intensely enthusiastic or passionate, especially to an excessive degree  (67, 41)
  • fervor — intense and passionate feeling; ardor, zeal  (118, 16; 118, 31; 128, 38)
  • festoon — adorn with ribbons, garlands, or other decorations; dress up  (141, 32)
  • fetish — a form of desire in which gratification is linked to an abnormal degree to a particular object, item of clothing, part of the body, etc.  (174, 23)
  • fetter — a chain or manacle used to restrain a prisoner, typically placed around the ankles; shackles, leg-irons  (133, 12; 155, 31; 158, 22)
  • fettered — restrained with chains or manacles, typically around the ankles  (71, 25; 182, 11)
  • fidelity — faithfulness to a person, cause, or belief, demonstrated by continuing loyalty and support  (48, 21)
  • fiery — having a passionate, quick-tempered nature; impassioned, ardent  (182, 5)
  • figurative — departing from a literal use of words; metaphorical; symbolic  (197, 15)
  • filch — pilfer or steal something, especially a thing of small value, in a casual way  (165, 16)
  • filthy — dirty, unkempt, disgusting, malodorous  (113, 7)
  • finite — having limits or bounds; restricted, definable  (217, 30)
  • fitfully — not regularly or continuously; intermittently; sporadically  (93, 3)
  • fitly — appropriately, suitably  (81, 12; 145, 3)
  • flagging — becoming tired or less dynamic; declining in strength  (171, 10)
  • flagrant — of something considered wrong or immoral, conspicuously or obviously offensive; blatant, glaring  (181, 22; 199, 21; 205, 23; 206, 14; 220, 27)
  • flattery — excessive and insincere praise, given especially to further one’s own interest  (51, 14; 134, 34; 208, 21)
  • flax — a blue-flowered herbaceous plant that is cultivated for its seed (linseed) and for textile fiber made from its stalks  (140, 9; 193, 26; 203, 2)
  • fleck — a small particle or speck of something  (148, 7)
  • fling — throw or hurl forcefully; cast, pitch, lob  (83, 33)
  • flinty — very hard and unyielding; hardened  (52, 3; 80, 17; 202, 29)
  • flitting — moving swiftly and lightly; darting, dancing  (58, 14)
  • florid — elaborately or excessively intricate or complicated; ornate, fancy  (84, 40)
  • floweret — one of the small flowers making up a composite flower head; a floret of cauliflower or broccoli  (37, 1)
  • fluctuating — rising and falling irregularly in number or amount  (187, 7)
  • foil — prevent something considered wrong or undesirable from succeeding; thwart, frustrate  (61, 18)
  • foiled — having one’s plans or desires thwarted  (59, 7; 63, 6; 208, 6)
  • foist — impose an unwelcome or unnecessary person or thing on  (191, 27
  • folly — lack of good sense; foolishness; stupidity, idiocy  (62, 30)
  • fondly — affectionately, lovingly  (76, 25)
  • forbearance — patient self-control; restraint and tolerance; endurance  (139, 7)
  • fords — shallow places in a river or stream allowing one to walk or drive across  (65, 2)
  • forerunner — a sign or warning of something to come; an advance messenger  (53, 16; 54, 9; 134, 7; 134, 36; 185, 1)
  • foreshadow — be a warning or indication of a future event; presage, portend  (80, 1; 94, 3)
  • forestall — prevent or obstruct (an anticipated event or action) by taking action ahead of time; preempt, anticipate  (188, 14)
  • forethought — careful consideration of what will be necessary or may happen in the future; planning  (71, 39)
  • forfeiture — the loss or giving up of something as a penalty for wrongdoing  (199, 40)
  • formalism — excessive adherence to prescribed forms; stilted in tradition  (88, 18; 121, 2; 174, 12; 202, 13; 203, 31; 209, 3)
  • formalist — one who excessively adherent to prescribed forms and stilted traditions  (203, 5)
  • formalistic — excessively adherent to prescribed forms; stilted in tradition  (175, 11)
  • formidable — inspiring fear or respect through being impressively large, powerful, intense, or capable  (vii, 38)
  • forthwith —  immediately; without delay; at once  (126, 41)
  • foully — in a wicked, shameful, or insulting manner  (179, 32)
  • foulness — the state of being offensive to the senses, especially through having a disgusting smell or taste or being unpleasantly soiled  (87, 6; 87, 23)
  • fragmentary — consisting of small parts that are disconnected or incomplete  (7, 5; 100, 22)
  • fraught — filled with or likely to result in something undesirable  (175, 21)
  • frenzy — a state or period of uncontrolled excitement or wild behavior  (21, 15; 110, 27; 148, 1)
  • fretting — be constantly or visibly worried or anxious; troubled  (49, 10)
  • frivolous — not having any serious purpose or value; flippant, glib  (41, 7; 122, 2; 148, 10)
  • fume — gas, smoke, or vapor that smells strongly or is dangerous to inhale; a pungent odor  (221, 31)
  • furious — extremely angry, enraged, infuriated  (109, 28; 116, 31)
  • fusile — easily melted  (72, 27)
  • futile — incapable of producing any useful result; pointless; fruitless, vain  (173, 37; 199, 35)

G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G

  • garb — clothing or dress, especially of a distinctive or special kind  (87, 39)
  • garland — a wreath of flowers and leaves, worn on the head or hung as a decoration  (32, 11; 74, 20)
  • garnished — decorated or embellished  (218, 19)
  • gay — lighthearted and carefree; cheery, merry  (83, 14; 181, 10)
  • Gemara — a rabbinical commentary on the Mishnah, forming the second part of the Talmud  (210, 23; 210, 27)
  • genial — friendly and cheerful, affable  (79, 23)
  • genuflexion — the lowering of one’s body briefly by bending one knee to the ground, typically in worship or as a sign of respect  (167, 13)
  • germane — relevant to a subject under consideration
  • gesticulations — gestures, especially dramatic ones, used instead of speaking or to emphasize one’s words  (157, 13)
  • ghastliness – the state of causing great horror or fear; frightful or macabre  (155, 25; 184, 29)
  • ghastly — something said quickly and suddenly; objectionable, bad, unpleasant  (109, 31; 110, 25; 184, 33)
  • giddy — disorienting and alarming, but exciting  (62, 39)
  • gilded — covered thinly with gold leaf or gold paint, or gifted and privileged  (33, 2; 37, 30; 83, 24; 110, 18; 181, 11; 186, 2)
  • girded — surround, encircle  (223, 25)
  • glad-hearted — carefree, cheery, merry, elated  (188, 32)
  • glaring — highly obvious or conspicuous, unmistakable  (140, 17)
  • glimmered — shone faintly with a wavering light; gleamed  (97, 7)
  • glittering — shining with a shimmering or sparkling light, or impressively successful and stellar  (113, 12; 182, 8)
  • glorification — the action of describing or representing something as admirable, especially unjustifiably  (77, 15)
  • gloss — a superficially attractive appearance or impression; facade, veneer  (209, 38)
  • glutton — a person who is excessively fond of or always eager for something, especially regarding good  (145, 40; 199, 20)
  • gluttonous — excessively greedy  (59, 22)
  • gluttony — habitual greed or excess in eating  (37, 31; 158, 29; 182, 37)
  • gnash — to grind one’s teeth together, typically as a sign of anger  (176, 36)
  • gorgeous — beautiful; very attractive; handsome, lovely  (81, 7)
  • gormandize  — the action of indulging in or being a connoisseur of good eating  (183, 1)
  • gory — involving or showing violence and bloodshed; grisly, gruesome  (184, 3)
  • gossamer — a fine, filmy substance consisting of cobwebs spun by small spiders, seen especially in autumn  (145, 38)
  • grandeur — splendor and impressiveness, especially of appearance or style; magnificence  (103, 19; 104, 10; 153, 23)
  • grandiose — impressive and imposing in appearance or style, especially pretentiously so; grand  (210, 28)
  • gratification — pleasure, especially when gained from the satisfaction of a desire; satisfaction, quenching  (101, 15)
  • greedily — with an intense and selfish desire for wealth or power; voraciously  (194, 9)
  • groat — any of various medieval European coins, in particular an English silver coin worth four old pence  (63, 28)
  • groveling — acting obsequiously in order to obtain forgiveness or favor  (88, 14)
  • guile — sly or cunning intelligence; craftiness, artifice  (72, 9)
  • guileless — devoid of guile; innocent and without deception; honest, sincere  (73, 7; 90, 34)
  • guilelessness — the quality of being innocent, without deception, honest and sincere  (171, 6)
  • guise — an external form, appearance, or manner of presentation, typically concealing the true nature of something  (57, 19;  167, 12; 221, 37)
  • gulfy — deep, ominous, profound, threatening  (191, 1)
  • gunwale — the upper edge of the side of a boat or ship  (112, 31)

H-H-H-H-H-H-H-H

  • habitually — done or doing constantly or as a habit; continually  (42, 24)
  • hack — cut with rough or heavy blows; chop, hew  (57, 11)
  • Hagiographa — the books of the Bible comprising the last of the three major divisions of the Hebrew scriptures, other than the Law and the Prophets. The books of the Hagiographa are: Ruth, Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Daniel, Esther, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles  (41, 32)
  • hail — call out to someone to attract attention; greet, salute, address  (96, 39)
  • hallowed — greatly revered and honored, consecrated  (27, 32; 166, 9)
  • hallucination — an experience involving the apparent perception of something not present; delusion, illusion  (157, 25)
  • hanker — feel a strong desire for or to do something; yearn, long  (181, 21)
  • harass — subject to aggressive pressure or intimidation; pester, badger  (168, 20)
  • hardy — robust; capable of enduring difficult conditions  (49, 18)
  • harmonious — free from disagreement or dissent  (107, 22)
  • harmonize — make consistent or compatible  (2, 15)
  • haughtiness — arrogance, conceit, snobbery, self-righteousness  (144, 17)
  • haughty — arrogantly superior and disdainful; conceited, snobbish  (62, 33; 91, 20; 91, 29; 122, 25; 161, 19; 181, 34; 219, 33)
  • haunt — to manifest oneself or itself at a place regularly, often in a spooky or suspicious manner  (173, 19)
  • hauteur — haughtiness of manner; disdainful pride, arrogance  (200, 18)
  • haven — a place of safety or refuge; sanctuary, shelter  (191, 9)
  • headship — the position of leader or chief  (45, 8)
  • heathen — a person who does not belong to a widely held religion, especially one who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim, as regarded by those who do  (83, 18; 86, 16; 127, 30; 182, 29; 200, 13)
  • heathendom — areas inhabited by those who do not belong to a widely held religion, especially one who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim, as regarded by those who do  (169, 10)
  • heathenish — paganistic, idolatrous, unbelieving  (83, 31)
  • heinous — utterly odious or wicked; evil, atrocious, monstrous  (114, 18; 205, 23; 205, 32)
  • herald — an official messenger bringing news  (54, 10; 74, 21)
  • hereditary — determined by genetic factors and therefore able to be passed on from parents to their offspring or descendants  (55, 21)
  • heresy — belief or opinion contrary to orthodox religious, especially Christian, doctrine  (57, 29; 174, 30; 175, 28; 222, 3)
  • heretic — one who holds an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted, especially in religious beliefs  (117, 37)
  • heretical — holding an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted, especially regarding religious beliefs  (34, 34)
  • hereupon — after or as a result of some action  (188, 20)
  • heroical — having the characteristics of a hero or heroine; very brave; courageous  (63, 19)
  • hermit — any person living in solitude or seeking to do so; recluse, loner  (108, 37; 133, 2)
  • heterogeneous — diverse in character or content; varied, varying  (87, 19)
  • hewn — chopped or cut with an axe, pick, or other tool, especially referring to wood or coal  (88, 37)
  • hideous — ugly or disgusting to look at; repulsive, revolting  (110, 19; 184, 31; 186, 29)
  • hitherward – to or toward this place  (115, 24)
  • hoarse — sounding rough and harsh, typically as the result of a sore throat or of shouting; throaty, croaking in nature  (43, 5)
  • homage — special honor or respect shown publicly; recognition, adulation  (63, 13; 194, 9)
  • homely — unattractive in appearance; plain  (163, 8)
  • homicidal — capable of or tending toward murder; murderous; violent, savage, brutal  (115, 36)
  • hospitality — the friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers  (75, 7; 137, 20)
  • hostility — unfriendliness or opposition, antagonism, bitterness  (95, 39)
  • huckstering — promoting or selling something, typically a product of questionable value  (87, 9)
  • hurl — to throw an object with great force, or to utter vehemently  (221, 14)
  • hybrid — of mixed character; composed of mixed parts; composite, combined  (98, 30)
  • hymning — praising or celebrating something  (76, 2)
  • hypocrisy — the practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one’s own behavior does not conform; pretense  (78, 25; 140, 16; 193, 21; 202, 40; 222, 19)
  • hypocrite — a person who indulges in stating one thing and then acting in a manner contrary to what he stated; a whited sepulcher  (52, 41)
  • hypocritical — behaving in a way that suggests one has higher standards or more noble beliefs than is the case; self-righteous  (202, 39; 209, 3; 216, 19; 221, 18)
  • hypotheses — a supposition or proposed explanation made on the basis of limited evidence as a starting point for further investigation; theory  (78, 12)

I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I

  • icy — unholy; wicked; inhospitable; unwelcoming  (138, 16; 181, 28)
  • idiom — a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words  (58, 11; 99, 34)
  • idyll —  an extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque episode or scene, typically an idealized or unsustainable one  (1, 5)
  • idyllic — relating to a time or place or situation that is extremely happy, peaceful, or picturesque  (7, 3)
  • ignoble — not honorable in character or purpose  (v, 28; 68, 28; 87, 28; 94, 40)
  • ignominious — deserving or causing public disgrace or shame, humiliating, shameful  (24, 20)
  • ill-humor — bad-temper; irritability  (161, 30)
  • illimitable — without limits or an end, unbounded  (135, 20)
  • illiterate — unable to read or write  (40, 1)
  • illuminate — make something visible or bright by shining light on it; light up  (49, 35)
  • illuminated — visible, lit up  (94, 41)
  • illuminating — enlightening, clarifying, revealing  (109, 22)
  • illumination — spiritual or intellectual enlightenment, insight, revelation  (112, 38)
  • illusion — a thing that is or is likely to be wrongly perceived or interpreted by the senses; a deceptive appearance  (58, 12)
  • illusory — based on illusion; not real, imagined, imaginary  (21, 28)
  • imbecility — foolishness, stupidity  (78, 24)
  • imitative — copying or following a model or example; mimicking  (187, 19)
  • immanent — existing or operating within; inherent; intrinsic  (58, 10)
  • immaterial — spiritual, rather than physical; unimportant under the circumstances; irrelevant  (59, 28)
  • immemorial — originating in the distant past; very old; ancient  (98, 2; 98, 20; 117, 39; 169, 3)
  • immortal — living forever; never dying or decaying; deathless, eternal  (99, 5)
  • impassioned — filled with or showing great emotion; heart-felt, wholehearted  (104, 39)
  • impeccability — of behavior, performance, or appearance in accordance with the highest standards of propriety; faultless  (56, 41)
  • impenetrable — impossible to pass through or enter; unpassable  (130, 26)
  • impenitent — not feeling shame or regret about one’s actions or attitudes  (140, 18)
  • imperiled — put at risk of being harmed, injured, or destroyed  (158, 30, 204, 1)
  • imperious — assuming power or authority without justification; arrogant and domineering; high-handed, commanding  (106, 27; 181, 34; 184, 1; 186, 4)
  • impetuous — acting or done quickly and without thought or care  (67, 41; 99, 22; 117, 36; 118, 12; 190, 31)
  • impetuosity — the tendency to act or respond quickly and without thought or care; impulsiveness  (45, 33; 49, 37; 112, 34)
  • impetuously — doing something in a quick manner, with little forethought or concern; impulsively  (197, 36)
  • implacable — unable to be soothed, appeased, or reassured  (181, 39; 212, 4)
  • implacably — lacking the possibility of being appeased, mollified, calmed, or soothed  (176, 30)
  • import — great significance; importance; consequence  (75, 27)
  • importunate — persistent, especially to the point of annoyance or intrusion; tenacious, insistent  (110, 6; 145, 29; 214, 1)
  • importunity — persistence, especially to the point of annoyance  (111, 23; 186, 14)
  • impotent — unable to take effective action; helpless or powerless; ineffectual  (179, 5; 207, 28)
  • impotence — a state of being unable to take effective action; a state of helplessness or powerlessness  (62, 38; 175, 22)
  • impost — a tax or similar compulsory payment  (113, 37; 114, 3)
  • import — the meaning or significance of something, especially when not directly stated; essence  (174, 11)
  • importunity — persistence, especially to the point of annoyance  (213, 13)
  • impotent — unable to take effective action; helpless or powerless; powerless, ineffective  (41, 7; 180, 30)
  • impregnate — soak or saturate something with a substance  (173, 16)
  • impugn — dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of a statement or motive; call into question  (vii, 32)
  • impulse — a sudden strong and unreflective urge or desire to act; urge, compulsion  (201, 12)
  • impulsive — acting or done without forethought, impetuous, hasty  (150, 7)
  • impure — unclean, soiled, stained, unholy  (198, 10)
  • imputation — a charge or claim that someone has done something undesirable; an accusation  (158, 10)
  • inalienable — unable to be taken away from or given away by the possessor; inviolable  (72, 26)
  • inalienably — absolute, unchangeable  (203, 16)
  • inane — silly; stupid, absurd, ridiculous  (77 18)
  • inanity — silliness, stupidity, ridiculousness  (82, 6)
  • inarticulate — unable to speak distinctly or express oneself clearly  (54, 23)
  • inartistic — having or showing a lack of skill or talent in art  (107, 24)
  • inauguration — the beginning or introduction of a system, policy, or period  (54, 12; 94, 5; 124, 30)
  • incapacity — physical or mental inability to do something or to manage one’s affairs; debility, impairment  (99, 38; 196, 36)
  • incarnate —  embodied in flesh; in human form (speaking especially of a deity or spirit  (123, 2)
  • incessant — continuing without pause or interruption  (vi, 9; 35, 36; 84, 1; 125, 4; 128, 26; 146, 32; 147, 13; 151, 12; 175, 2; 200, 34)
  • incestuous — promoting or involving sexual relations between people classed as being too closely related to marry each other  (180, 32; 181, 25)
  • incipient — in an initial stage; beginning to happen or develop; developing, emerging  (132, 39)
  • incoherent — expressed in an incomprehensible or confusing way; unclear  (164, 11)
  • inconceivable — not capable of being imagined or grasped mentally; unbelievable  (18, 19)
  • incongruous — not in harmony or keeping with the surroundings or other aspects of something; out of place, inappropriate  (222, 37)
  • incorruptible — not subject to death or decay or evil; everlasting  (121, 9)
  • incredulity — the state of being unwilling or unable to believe something; a state of disbelief or unbelief  (97, 22)
  • incredulous — unwilling or unable to believe something; dubious, unconvinced  (93, 8; 196, 27; 215, 14)
  • incubus — a cause of distress or anxiety  (174, 27)
  • inculcate — instill an attitude, idea, or habit by persistent instruction  (140, 14; 212, 35; 213, 21)
  • inculcated — having instilled an attitude, idea, or habit by persistent instruction  (127, 2)
  • indecent — not conforming with generally accepted standards of behavior or propriety; obscene; filthy, vulgar  (183, 5)
  • indelible — not able to be forgotten or removed  (75, 12)
  • indelibly — not able to be forgotten or removed  (65, 21; 213, 23)
  • indescribable — too unusual, extreme, or indefinite to be adequately described; inexpressible  (109, 39; 112, 36; 144, 29)
  • indifference — lack of interest, concern, or sympathy  (2, 3; 139, 4; 174, 12)
  • indignant — feeling or showing anger or annoyance at what is perceived as unfair treatment  (41, 37; 71, 32; 88, 10; 139, 38; 165, 23; 202, 18)
  • indignantly — in such a way as to feel or show anger and annoyance at what is perceived to be unfair  (88, 25)
  • indignation — anger or annoyance provoked by what is perceived as unfair treatment  (11, 17; 39, 12; 51, 2; 53, 23; 88, 4; 138, 23; 143, 6; 179, 5; 181, 5; 181, 13; 207, 37; 211, 15; 218, 28; 220, 22; 222, 16)
  • indiscriminately — done at random or without careful judgment  (87, 16)
  • indispensable — excessive religious zeal; essential, crucial  (117, 41)
  • indisputable — unable to be challenged or denied  (11, 5; 42, 23; 59, 33; 73, 21; 101, 5; 157, 33; 191, 29; 217, 20)
  • individuality — the quality or character of a particular person or thing that distinguishes them from others of the same kind, especially when strongly marked; uniqueness, originality  (92, 22)
  • indolent — wanting to avoid activity or exertion; lazy; slothful, idle  (22, 26)
  • indubitably — impossible to doubt; unquestionably; indisputably  (70, 21)
  • induce — succeed in persuading or influencing someone to do something; convince  (204, 37)
  • indulgence — the act of allowing oneself to enjoy or participate in something, to give way to  (201, 17)
  • ineffaceable — unable to be erased or forgotten  (89, 8)
  • ineffable — too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words, beyond description  (25, 24)
  • ineffectual — not producing any or the desired effect; unsuccessful, powerless  (85, 23; 173, 27)
  • inestimable — too great to calculate  (ix, 33; 24, 37)
  • inevitable — certain to happen; unavoidable; inescapable  (79, 5; 154, 29; 154, 36; 169, 14)
  • inevitably — as is certain to happen; unavoidably; of necessity  (61, 1; 79, 1)
  • inexorable — impossible to stop or prevent; unavoidable  (179, 10)
  • infamous — well known for some bad quality or deed, wicked, abominable  (20, 7; 183, 37; 187, 17)
  • infamy — the state of being well known for some bad quality or deed; disrepute, notoriety  (51, 23: 64, 4; 105, 10; 134, 10; 201,27)
  • infanticide — the practice or crime, either by a society or by a person, of killing unwanted children soon after birth  (18, 22)
  • infatuation — an intense but short-lived passion or admiration for someone or something; intense love for, preoccupation with  (211, 11)
  • infer — deduce or conclude information from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements  (39, 5)
  • inference — a conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning; deduction, conclusion  (68, 33; 129, 1; 149, 15; 158, 8; 175, 11; 193, 38; 210, 16)
  • infidelity — the action or state of being unfaithful to a spouse or other sexual partner  (88, 15; 180, 6)
  • infinitely — limitless or endless in space, extent, or size; impossible to measure or calculate  (57, 35; 122, 12)
  • infinitude — the state or quality of being infinite or having no limit; endlessness  (172, 15)
  • infirmity — physical or mental weakness; illness  (63, 7)
  • infraction — a violation or infringement of a law or agreement; a breach, a breaking of  (208, 13)
  • infringement — the action of breaking the terms of a law, agreement, or arrangement; a violation  (4, 7; 195, 18)
  • infuriated — enraged, incensed, angry, vehement  (176, 30)
  • inhospitable — of an environment harsh and difficult to live in; unwelcoming  (159, 17)
  • inimitable — so good or unusual as to be impossible to copy; unique; distinctive, quirky  (211, 13)
  • inimitably — the quality or character of a particular person or thing that distinguishes them from others of the same kind, especially when strongly marked; uniquely, distinctly  (92, 22)
  • initiation — the action of beginning something; introduction, admission  (93, 16)
  • injunction — an authoritative warning or order  (31, 7; 126, 14; 206, 16)
  • injustice — lack of fairness or justice; the state of being unfair, corrupt, cruel  (92, 6)
  • inmost — innermost, deepest, profound  (166, 21)
  • innately — inborn; natural; inherent  (104, 13)
  • inopportune — occurring at an inconvenient or inappropriate time; untimely, mistimed  (222, 29)
  • inquisitor — a person making an inquiry, especially one seen to be excessively harsh or searching  (215, 29)
  • insatiable — impossible to satisfy; unquenchable, unappeasable  (192, 29)
  • insensate — lacking sympathy or compassion; unfeeling; completely lacking sense or reason  (93, 41; 206, 30)
  • insidious – proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with harmful effects  (56, 18)
  • insinuate — suggest or hint something bad or reprehensible in an indirect and unpleasant way; intimate  (40, 13)
  • insolence — rude and disrespectful behavior; impertinence  (51, 24)
  • insolent — showing a rude and arrogant lack of respect  (19, 24; 39, 41; 215, 22; 216, 5)
  • insouciance — the trait of showing a casual lack of concern; indifference  (40, 24)
  • instantaneity — the quality of being instant or immediate  (72, 28)
  • instantaneous — occurring or done in an instant or instantly  (72, 26; 125, 34; 166, 34)
  • instantaneously — immediately, of a sudden  (110, 9; 130, 36)
  • insuperable — impossible to overcome  (viii, 1)
  • insurrection — a violent uprising against an authority or government  (4, 8)
  • intelligible — able to be understood; comprehensible; comprehensible, accessible  (42, 5)
  • intemperance — lack of moderation or restraint; overindulgence  (199, 29(
  • intemperate — having or showing a lack of self-control; immoderate; unreasonable  (57, 6)
  • intercourse — communication or dealings between individuals or groups; verbal interchange  (70, 2; 97, 15; 100, 7; 127, 22; 132, 9; 136, 28; 155, 19)
  • intermission — a pause or a break, an interlude  (214, 16)
  • interpolation — inserting or entering something of a different nature into something else  (173, 5; 220, 37)
  • interposed — placed or inserted between one thing and another  (92, 6)
  • intimate — a very close and personal friend when used as a noun, or imply, hint, or make known when used a verb  (185, 36; 197, 16)
  • intimation — an indication or hint  (9, 38; 163, 4; 222, 10)
  • intolerable — unable to be endured; unbearable, insufferable  (71, 28; 88, 33)
  • intrinsic — belonging naturally; essential; inherent, innate  (108, 29)
  • intrinsically — belonging naturally; essentially, innately  (101, 3; 108, 3; 207, 3)
  • intrude — put oneself deliberately into a place or situation where one is unwelcome or uninvited  (8, 35)
  • intrusion — to put oneself deliberately into a place or situation where one is unwelcome or uninvited  (3, 8; 160, 16)
  • intrusive — causing disruption or annoyance through being unwelcome or uninvited  (219, 9)
  • intuition — the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning  (139, 12)
  • intuitively — without conscious reasoning; instinctively  (67, 23; 122, 36)
  • inured — to have accustomed someone to something, especially something unpleasant; hardened, toughened, steeled   (83, 9)
  • inveterate — having a particular habit, activity, or interest that is long-established and unlikely to change; ingrained, deep-seated  (202, 24)
  • invincible — too powerful to be defeated or overcome; unconquerable  (88, 3; 160, 37)
  • involuntary — done without will or conscious control, by reflex, involuntary  (103, 27)
  • irony — the expression of one’s meaning by using language that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or emphatic effect  (200, 25; 206, 8; 223, 17)
  • irreclaimable — not able to be reclaimed or reformed  (155, 22)
  • irreconcilable — of ideas or facts representing points of view that are so different from each other that they cannot be made compatible  (7, 30; 40, 23)
  • irrefragable — not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable  (xiv, 16)
  • irrelevant — not connected with or relevant to something  (7, 13)
  • irremovable — incapable of being removed or displaced  (119, 41)
  • irreparable — impossible to rectify or repair; irrevocable  (198, 11)
  • irresistible — too attractive and tempting to be resisted; attractive, alluring  (71, 14; 87, 14; 103, 27)
  • irreverence — the tendency to show a lack of respect for persons or things that are generally appreciated by others  (87, 13)
  • irreverent — showing a lack of respect for people or things that are generally taken seriously; disrespectful   (56, 23: 62, 34; 78, 13; 106, 3; 151, 12: 197, 4)
  • irrevocable — not able to be changed, reversed, or recovered; final  (179, 10)
  • islet — a very small island  (63, 41)
  • iterative — relating to the repetition of a process or utterance  (122, 2)

J-J-J-J-J-J-J-J

  • jocund — cheerful, lighthearted
  • juggernaut — a huge, powerful, and overwhelming force or institution

K-K-K-K-K-K-K-K

  • kaleidoscope — a constantly changing pattern or sequence of objects or elements
  • khan –in the Middle East, an inn for travelers, built around a central courtyard; a caravanserai  (2, 23)
  • kindlings — arousals, inspirations, stimulations  (73, 18)
  • knickknack — a small worthless object, especially a household ornament; a gewgaw, a trinket  (86, 5)

L-L-L-L-L-L-L-L

  • labyrinth — a complicated irregular network of passages or paths in which it is difficult to find one’s way; a maze  (58, 29)
  • labyrinthine — involving a complicated and irregular network of passages or paths; a maze  (122, 8)
  • lacerating — severely critical or hurtful; painfully penetrating  (64, 22)
  • lambent — glowing, gleaming, or flickering with a soft radiance  (54, 22)
  • lamentation — the passionate expression of grief or sorrow; weeping  (18, 17; 130, 11)
  • languid — displaying or having a disinclination for physical exertion or effort; slow and relaxed; unhurried, complacent  (175, 33)
  • languish —  lose or lack vitality; grow weak or feeble, weaken, decline  (131, 16; 133, 36)
  • languor — the state or feeling of being tired, listless, or tranquil  (4, 23; 38, 4)
  • lascivious — feeling or revealing an overt and often offensive sexual desire; lecherous, lewd, libidinous  (120, 34; 211, 30)
  • lassitude — a state of physical or mental weariness; lack of energy; lethargy  (132, 31)
  • latent — existing but not yet developed or manifest; hidden or concealed; dormant, quiescent  (131, 12)
  • lattice — a structure consisting of strips of wood or metal crossed and fastened together with square or diamond-shaped spaces left between, used as a screen or fence or as a support for climbing plants  (102, 23)
  • laver — in biblical use, a large brass bowl for the ritual ablutions of Jewish priests  (54, 18)
  • lavish — to bestow something in generous or extravagant quantities on; to shower upon, to heap upon   (75, 7; 88, 32)
  • lavishly — in a manner displaying sumptuous riches, elaborateness, or luxuriousness  (122, 27)
  • leaden — dull, heavy, or slow; inactive, inert  (80, 24)
  • leathern — made of leather  (181, 24)
  • legalism — excessive adherence to law or formula  (176, 22)
  • legalist — one who adheres excessively or aggressively to law or formula  (205, 13)
  • legate— a general or governor of an ancient Roman province, or their deputy  (4, 5)
  • legendary — remarkable enough to be famous; very well known; celebrated, renowned   (120, 17)
  • legion — a vast host, multitude, or number of people or things; a horde  (134, 7)
  • legionaries — soldiers in a Roman legion  (53, 29)
  • lethargy — a lack of energy and enthusiasm; torpor, inactivity  (173, 33)
  • letters — literature; scholarly knowledge, erudition  (104, 6)
  • Levitical — of rules concerning codes of conduct, temple rituals, etc. derived from the biblical Book of Leviticus  (91, 2)
  • liable — responsible by law; legally answerable  (57, 33; 57, 34; 205, 24)
  • liberate — set someone or something free from a situation, especially imprisonment or slavery, in which their liberty is severely restricted  (134, 7)
  • libration — an apparent or real oscillation of the moon, by which parts near the edge of the disc that are often not visible from the earth sometimes come into view  (30, 21)
  • lichen — a simple slow-growing plant that typically forms a low crusty, leaflike, or branching growth on rocks, walls, and trees  (38, 23)
  • limpid — unclouded, transparent, clear  (55, 5; 80, 29; 110, 17; 214, 30)
  • literalism — the interpretation of words in their usual or most basic sense  (97, 27; 99, 33; 122, 8; 194, 7; 203, 40)
  • liturgy — a form or formulary according to which public religious worship, especially Christian worship, is conducted  (212, 20)
  • loath – reluctant; unwilling (adjective)   (115, 31)
  • loathe — feel intense dislike or disgust for; detest, abhor  (138, 6; 148, 1)
  • loathly — causing hatred or disgust; repulsive, abhorrent  (184, 23)
  • loathsome — causing hatred or disgust; repulsive; abhorrent, odious  (125, 21)
  • lofty — proud, aloof, or self-important  (53, 24; 139, 9; 194, 23)
  • logomachy — an argument about words  (92, 39)
  • lore — a body of traditions and knowledge on a subject or held by a particular group, typically passed from person to person by word of mouth  (41, 12; 50, 21)
  • lucid — expressed clearly; easy to understand; intelligible, cogent  (156, 11)
  • ludicrous — so foolish, unreasonable, or out of place as to be amusing; ridiculous; absurd, preposterous  (204, 3)
  • lulled — abated, fell quiet, calmed  (191, 8)
  • lugging — carrying or dragging (a heavy or bulky object) with great effort; heaving, hoisting  (118, 28)
  • luminous — full of or shedding light; bright or shining, especially in the dark; brilliant, radiant  (150, 12; 201, 6)
  • lust — a sensual appetite regarded as sinful; craving, intense desire   (71, 33)
  • lustful — possessing a sensual appetite regarded as sinful; prone to cravings and intense desires  (182, 8)
  • lustration — the act of purifying by expiatory sacrifice, ceremonial washing, or some other ritual action  (94, 12)
  • luxuriant —  extremely comfortable, elegant, or enjoyable, especially in a way that involves great expense; opulent, sumptuous  (149, 40)
  • luxurious — extremely comfortable, elegant, or enjoyable, especially in a way that involves great expense; opulent, sumptuous  (50, 38; 143, 39; 150, 8; 182, 26; 183, 8)

M-M-M-M-M-M-M-M

  • maceration — the process of causing to grow thinner or to waste away, especially by fasting  (108, 37)
  • madden — to make someone extremely annoyed; infuriate, exasperate  (89, 20)
  • maddened — infuriated, exasperated, incredibly annoyed or irritated  (105, 19)
  • magnetic — attractive, enticing, captivating  (165, 9)
  • mail — armor made of metal rings or plates joined together flexibly  (53, 32)
  • maimed — wounded or injured so that a part of the body is permanently damaged; disabled  (207, 11)
  • mainstay — a person or thing on which something else is based or depends  (61, 11)
  • majestic — having or showing impressive beauty or dignity; exalted, elevated  (220, 33)
  • malady — a disease or ailment; illness, sickness  (156, 35; 157, 5; 164, 34)
  • malediction — a magical word or phrase uttered with the intention of bringing about evil or destruction; a curse  (55, 2; 87, 36)
  • malice — the intention or desire to do evil; ill will; animosity, hostility  (183, 30; 197, 18; 202, 8; 202, 23)
  • malicious — characterized by malice; intending or intended to do harm; spiteful, malevolent  (199, 21)
  • malignant — spiteful, hostile, malicious  (17, 38; 103, 35; 207, 15)
  • malignity — malevolence, harshness, rudeness  (49, 13; 175, 27; 202, 22; 207, 40; 216, 23)
  • malpractices — improper, illegal, or negligent professional activity or treatment, especially by a medical practitioner, lawyer, or public official; wrong-doings  (114, 12)
  • mandate — to give someone authority to act in a certain way; to require something to be done; to make mandatory  (18, 3; 87, 22; 155, 5)
  • manifestation — an event, action, or object that clearly shows or embodies something, especially a theory or an abstract idea; display, demonstration  (192, 32)
  • manifold – many and various; multiple, numerous  (115, 30)
  • manna — an unexpected or gratuitous benefit  (120, 21; 193, 39)
  • martyr — a person who is killed because of their religious or other beliefs  (73, 35; 117, 10)
  • martyrdom — a situation where a person is killed because of religious or other beliefs  (179, 29)
  • masquerade — a false show or pretense; deception  (171, 22)
  • materialism — a tendency to consider material possessions and physical comfort as more important than spiritual values  (177, 5; 197, 6)
  • maxim — a short, pithy statement expressing a general truth or rule of conduct  (41, 2; 135, 18)
  • mean — lowly, humble  (5, 10; 142, 33)
  • meanness — unkindness, spitefulness, or unfairness: also, lack of quality or attractiveness; shabbiness  (37, 24; 70, 32; 182, 8)
  • mediatorial — of, relating to, or appropriate to a mediator, or someone who intervenes   (66, 2)
  • meditative — of, involving, or absorbed in meditation or considered thought; contemplative, reflective  (117, 27)
  • melancholy — a feeling of pensive sadness, typically with no obvious cause; woe  (110, 27)
  • mercenary — relating to a person or their behavior who is primarily concerned with making money at the expense of ethics  (5, 4; 165, 39)
  • meritorious — deserving reward or praise; laudable, commendable  (210, 27)
  • Messiahship — relating to the promised deliverer of the Jewish nation prophesied in the Hebrew Bible  (99, 3)
  • metaphor — a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable  (163, 8; 195, 29; 196, 14; 197, 17)
  • midrash — an ancient commentary on part of the Hebrew scriptures, attached to the biblical text  (50, 40)
  • minaret — a tall slender tower, typically part of a mosque, with a balcony from which a muezzin calls Muslims to prayer  (24, 8)
  • minstrelsy — the art or occupation of a medieval minstrel, including shows, songs, dances, and comedy routines  (1, 14)
  • minute — extremely small, minimal, trifling  (65, 20; 107, 33)
  • minutiae — the small, precise, or trivial details of something  (viii, 3; 122, 15; 174, 26)
  • mirth — amusement, especially as expressed in laughter, merriment  (33, 20; 80,11)
  • mirthful — merry, cheerful, high-spirited, animated  (75, 24; 77, 5)
  • misconstrue — interpret something, especially a person’s words or actions, wrongly; misunderstand  (208, 10)
  • Mishnah —  an authoritative collection of exegetical material embodying the oral tradition of Jewish law and forming the first part of the Talmud  (210, 23; 210, 27)
  • missal — a book containing the texts used in the Catholic Mass throughout the year  (68, 12)
  • mongering — promoting a specified activity, situation, or feeling, especially one that is undesirable or discreditable  (88, 14)
  • monosyllable — a word consisting of only one syllable  (130, 24)
  • moonstruck — unable to think or act normally, especially because of being in love  (110, 28)
  • mortification — the action of subduing one’s bodily desires; or embarrassment and shame  (49, 17; 75, 10; 162, 20)
  • mortified — embarrassed, humiliated, shamed  (95, 8)
  • motley — incongruously varied in appearance or character; disparate; diverse, miscellaneous  (143, 14)
  • mummified — preserve by embalming and wrapping in cloth, usually referring to a body  (40, 3)
  • munificence — the quality or action of being lavishly generous; great generosity  (108, 41)
  • murderous — capable of or intending to murder; dangerously violent; brutal, violent, savage  (185, 11)
  • murmurer — one who expresses discontent or unhappiness in a subdued or quiet manner  (197, 28)
  • muse — be absorbed in thought; to ponder, to consider  (73, 8)
  • musing — a period of reflection or thought  (46, 7; 50, 13; 52, 25; 73, 14; 97, 1)
  • mute — not expressed in speech, wordless, silent  (177, 9)
  • myriad — a countless or extremely great number, a plethora  (38, 19; 127, 38;  222, 12)
  • mystic — spiritually allegorical or symbolic; transcending human understanding  (67, 36; 80, 13; 117, 29)
  • mystical — spiritually allegorical or symbolic; transcending human understanding; metaphorical  (80, 1)

N-N-N-N-N-N-N-N

  • naïve —  natural and unaffected; innocent  (116, 40; 169, 26)
  • nard — a costly perfumed ointment much valued in ancient times  (138, 11)
  • nebulous — in the form of a cloud or haze; hazy, vague, indefinite  (14, 23)
  • nemesis — a long-standing rival; an archenemy, a rival, a foe  (64, 17)
  • neophyte — a person who is new to a subject, skill, or belief; beginner, novice, new-comer  (70, 16)
  • nerve — brace oneself mentally to face a demanding situation  (189, 34)
  • nightjar — a nocturnal insectivorous bird with gray-brown camouflaged plumage, large eyes and gape, and a distinctive call  (115, 7)
  • nirvana — a state of perfect happiness; an ideal or idyllic place; paradise, heaven  (123, 21)
  • noble — having or showing fine personal qualities or high moral principles and ideals; virtuous, praiseworthy  (87, 14)
  • nobleness — the state or condition of showing fine personal qualities or high moral principles and ideals; dignity, refinement  (105, 13)
  • noisome — having an extremely offensive smell; disagreeable, unpleasant  (86, 2)
  • notion — a conception of or belief about something; idea, belief  (199, 7)
  • notorious — famous or well known, typically for some bad quality or deed; infamous, scandalous  (114, 12; 137, 25)
  • novel — new, untried  (187, 5)
  • nuance — a subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound  (158, 7)
  • nugatory — of no value, importance, or worth  (197, 21)
  • nuptial — relating to marriage or weddings; matrimonial, marital  (124, 20)

O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O

  • obdurate — stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action, unbending, stubborn
  • objection — an expression or feeling of disapproval or opposition; a reason for disagreeing; a protest or protestation  (200, 32)
  • obliterated — destroyed utterly; wiped out, totally erased   (71, 32; 210, 3)
  • obliteration — eradication, destruction, total erasure, annihilation  (49, 39)
  • oblivion — extinction, obscurity, nonexistence  (210, 32)
  • oblivious – not aware of or not concerned about what is happening around one   (56, 12)
  • obscene — offensive or disgusting by accepted standards of morality and decency; scandalous, vile  (71, 31; 109, 16)
  • obscure — not clearly expressed or easily understood; uncertain, in doubt  (99, 4; 179, 23; 217, 17)
  • obscurity — the state of being unknown, inconspicuous, or unimportant  (18, 10; 48, 4)
  • obsolete — no longer produced or used; out of date; outmoded   (163, 15)
  • obstinacy — the quality or condition of being obstinate; stubbornness; inflexibility  (45, 29; 160, 37; 203, 32)
  • obstinate — stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or chosen course of action, despite attempts to persuade one to do so; stubborn, headstrong  (91, 30)
  • obtrusive — overbearing, unwelcome, unpleasantly conspicuous, domineering  (197, 3)
  • obtrusiveness — in a manner that is noticeable or prominent in an unwelcome or intrusive way; conspicuous  (167, 17)
  • obviate — to remove a need or difficulty  (18, 29; 54, 13)
  • odious — extremely unpleasant; repulsive; disgusting  (137, 24)
  • odium — general or widespread hatred or disgust directed toward someone or something as a result of their or its actions; disgust, repugnance  (108, 12; 114, 16)
  • oleander — a poisonous evergreen Old World shrub that is widely grown in warm countries for its clusters of white, pink, or red flowers  (81, 14; 81, 30)
  • oleaster — a Eurasian shrub or small tree cultivated as an ornamental bush  (128, 8)
  • omnipotence — the quality of having unlimited or very great power; supremacy  (155, 2)
  • oppressed — subject to harsh and authoritarian treatment; persecuted, maltreated  (198, 2)
  • oracular — prophetic, predictive, prescient, prognostic in nature  (67, 35)
  • orifice — an opening, as of a pipe or tube, or one in the body, such as a nostril or the anus  (76, 40)
  • orison — a prayer, a supplication  (212, 16)
  • orthodox — conforming to what is generally or traditionally accepted as right or true; established and approved  (26, 13; 56, 33; 122, 7; 220, 32)
  • orthodoxy — authorized or generally accepted theory, doctrine, or practice  (57, 19; 57, 27; 84, 20; 121, 29; 127, 5; 158, 11; 220, 28)
  • ostentation — pretentious and vulgar display, especially of wealth and luxury, intended to impress or attract notice  (121, 4; 220, 28)
  • ostentatious — pretentious, showy, arrogant, seeking to impress or attract attention  (144, 4; 220, 5)
  • otiose — serving no practical purpose or result, useless  (149, 26)
  • overawe — impress someone so much that they become silent or inhibited  (53, 21; 81, 9; 105, 14; 105, 25; 176, 36)
  • overawed — the state of being impressed to the point of silence or inhibition  (97, 25; 161, 29)
  • overlaid — covered with a coating, veneered  (161, 8)
  • overshadowed — appeared much more prominent or important than; eclipsed, outshone  (99, 19)
  • overstrained — subject to an excessive demand on strength, resources, or abilities  (56, 14)

P-P-P-P-P-P-P-P

  • pagan — a person holding religious beliefs other than those of the main world religions  (71, 35)
  • pale — seem less impressive or important; fade  (131, 37)
  • palliate — to allay or moderate fears or suspicions; disguise the seriousness or gravity of an offense  (20, 15)
  • palmary — outstanding, best, exemplary  (162, 2)
  • palpable — of a feeling or atmosphere so intense as to seem almost tangible  (viii, 37)
  • palsied — affected with or by paralysis and involuntary tremors  (198, 31)
  • paltry — small, meager, trifling, insignificant  (88, 5)
  • pang — a sudden sharp pain or painful emotion  (4, 24; 59, 16, 59, 40; 64, 23)
  • pantomime — an absurdly exaggerated piece of behavior  (183, 10)
  • paps — a woman’s breasts or nipples  (144, 40)
  • parabolic — of or expressed in parables or illustrative stories  (196, 23)
  • paradox — a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement or proposition that when investigated or explained may prove to be well founded or true  (122, 38; 195, 36)
  • parallelism — the state of being parallel or aligned, or of corresponding in some way  (139, 8)
  • paralytic — relating to being incapacitated or paralyzed  (127, 27)
  • paramour — a lover, especially the illicit partner of a married person  (141, 3; 184, 13)
  • paranymph — a friend going with a bridegroom to fetch home the bride in ancient times; the bridesmaid conducting the bride to the bridegroom; best man  (74, 25)
  • paraphernalia — miscellaneous articles, especially the equipment needed for a particular activity; equipment, apparatus  (199, 11; 210, 32)
  • parenthesis — a word, clause, or sentence inserted as an explanation or afterthought into a passage that is grammatically complete without it, in writing usually marked off by curved brackets, dashes, or commas  (98, 27)
  • parhelion — a bright spot in the sky appearing on either side of the sun, formed by refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the earth’s atmosphere  (6, 17)
  • pariah — an outcast, a stray, someone of low socioeconomic level  (3, 9)
  • paroxysm — a sudden attack or violent expression of a particular emotion or activity  (11, 10; 109, 34; 155, 28; 156, 33)
  • parturition — the action of giving birth to young; childbirth  (217, 11)
  • Paschal — relating to Easter or the Jewish Passover  (65, 29)
  • passion — strong and barely controllable emotion, or the suffering and death of Jesus  (196, 2)
  • passionate — showing or caused by strong feelings or a strong belief; ardent, fervent  (106, 35; 117, 34; 190, 34; 203, 29)
  • pathetic — arousing pity, especially through vulnerability or sadness  (55, 9; 68, 24)
  • pathetically — in a manner that arouses pity, especially through vulnerability or sadness  (96, 20)
  • pathos — a quality that evokes pity or sadness; sadness, poignancy  (82, 21; 130, 9)
  • patronage — a patronizing or condescending manner; disdain, disrespect  (139, 3)
  • patronize — treat in a way that is apparently kind or helpful but that betrays a feeling of superiority  (219, 27; 220, 20)
  • patronizing — apparently kind or helpful but betraying a feeling of superiority; condescending  (92, 25)
  • pauper — a very poor and destitute person  (28, 38; 146, 1)
  • peal — a loud repeated or reverberating sound of thunder or laughter  (223, 16)
  • peccability — capable of sinning  (56, 41)
  • peculiarly — more than usually; especially; oddly  (176, 3)
  • pedantic — scrupulous, precise, exact, demanding  (174, 12)
  • pedantism — something that is precise, exact, and demanding  (213, 25)
  • peevish — easily irritated, especially by unimportant things, fractious, petulant  (135, 32; 199, 28)
  • penitence — the action of feeling or showing sorrow and regret for having done wrong; repentance  (50, 3; 52, 17; 138, 13; 141, 18; 201, 8; 201, 10; 202, 14)
  • penitent — feeling or showing sorrow and regret for having done wrong; repentant  (53, 2; 54, 2; 125, 35; 139, 12)
  • perennial — lasting or existing for a long or apparently infinite time; enduring or continually recurring  (43, 3)
  • perilous — full of danger or risk, hazardous  (57, 24; 189, 18; 190, 20)
  • perjury — the offense of willfully telling an untruth in a court after having taken an oath or affirmation  (120, 35)
  • permeate — spread throughout something; pervade  (120, 30)
  • pernicious — having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way, harmful, destructive  (27, 14; 210, 17)
  • perplexed — puzzled, baffled, mystified, confused  (95, 8)
  • perplexing — puzzling, baffling, confusing  (101, 34)
  • perplexity — a complicated or baffling situation or thing; problem, difficulty, conundrum  (79, 27; 143, 5)
  • pertinacity — adhering resolutely to an opinion, purpose, or design; stubbornly persistent  (164, 36; 213, 36)
  • perturbance — a cause of disturbance, upset, or disruption  (222, 22)
  • perturbed — anxious, unsettled, worried, upset  (109, 20; 156, 20; 157, 26)
  • pervade — spread through and be perceived in every part of; permeate, fill  (223, 3)
  • perversity — a deliberate desire to behave in an unreasonable or unacceptable way; contrariness  (202, 8)
  • pervert — alter (something) from its original course, meaning, or state to a distortion or corruption of what was first intended; distort, corrupt  (62, 41; 88, 11)
  • petrified — relating to organic matter that has been changed into a stony substance; ossified; also frightened or terrified  (59, 40)
  • pettiness — involved in or related to things of little importance, trivialities  (122, 8)
  • petty — of little importance; trivial  (51, 17; 132, 12; 177, 1)
  • petulant — childishly sulky or bad-tempered,  ill-tempered  (27, 1)
  • phalanx — a body of troops or police officers standing or moving in close formation  (47, 33)
  • phantasmagoria — a sequence of real or imaginary images like those seen in a dream  (57, 9)
  • phantom — a figment of the imagination; a ghost; an apparition; a specter  (57, 24; 185, 21; 190, 25)
  • pharisaical — rigidly traditional, acting as would a Pharisee, a member of an ancient Jewish sect, distinguished by strict observance of the traditional and written law, and commonly held to have pretensions to superior sanctity  (57, 28; 90, 3; 121, 2)
  • Pharisee — a member of an ancient Jewish sect, distinguished by strict observance of the traditional and written law, and commonly held to have pretensions to superior sanctity; a self-righteous person, a hypocrite  (91, 33; 91, 36)
  • philosophic — relating or devoted to the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence  (122, 35)
  • phylactery — a small leather box containing Hebrew texts on vellum, worn by Jewish men at morning prayer as a reminder to keep the law  (50, 38; 144, 2; 216, 34)
  • pictorial — of or expressed in pictures; illustrated  (196, 19)
  • picturesque — visually attractive, especially in a quaint or pretty style  (54, 29; 96, 20; 129, 29)
  • pietism — pious sentiment, especially of an exaggerated or affected nature  (177, 2)
  • pietist — one who displays pious or self-righteous sentiment, especially of an exaggerated or affected nature  (117, 30)
  • piety — the quality of being religious or reverent  (2, 7; 44, 10; 174, 27)
  • pillared — supported by a tall vertical structure of stone, wood, or metal, used as a support for a building, or as an ornament or monument  (102, 15)
  • pine — suffer a mental and physical decline, especially because of a broken heart; languish  (133, 32)
  • pinnace — a small boat, with sails or oars, forming part of the equipment of a warship or other large vessel  (83, 25)
  • pinnacle — the most successful point; the culmination; a high, pointed piece of rock  (62, 23)
  • pious — devoutly religious; also, making a hypocritical display of virtue  (29, 5; 35, 31; 48, 15; 72, 12; 172, 4; 177, 37; 200, 10; 210, 29)
  • pitiable — deserving or arousing the feeling of sorrow and compassion caused by the suffering and misfortunes of others  (125, 16)
  • pitiless — showing no pity; cruel  (19, 31)
  • placid — not easily upset or excited; calm, tranquil  (50, 4)
  • plenipotentiary — a person, especially a diplomat, invested with the full power of independent action on behalf of their government, typically in a foreign country  (170, 39)
  • plough — move in a fast and uncontrolled manner; plunge, hurtle  (83, 22)
  • plumage — a bird’s feathers collectively (33, 41; 53, 26)
  • plumes — a long, soft feather or arrangement of feathers used by a bird for display or worn by a person for ornament  (46, 33)
  • plunderer — one who steals goods from a place or person, typically using force and in a time of war or civil disorder  (11, 15)
  • poetic — having an imaginative or sensitively emotional style of expression; expressive, figurative  (72, 19)
  • pointed — of a remark or look expressing criticism in a direct and unambiguous way; biting, incisive  (75, 27)
  • polemic — a strong verbal or written attack on someone or something  (vii, 29)
  • pollutions — the presence in or introduction into the environment of a substance or thing that has harmful or poisonous effects  (87, 16).
  • pomp — ceremony and splendid display, especially at a public event  (77, 14; 120, 16; 124, 5)
  • pomposity — arrogant, considering oneself to be superior, the inclination of having a grandiose opinion of oneself  (176, 35)
  • pompous — affectedly and irritatingly grand, solemn, or self-important; overbearing, arrogant  (84, 20; 116, 5)
  • populace — the people living in a particular country or area; inhabitants, residents  (111, 24; 200, 28)
  • portent — a sign or warning that something, especially something momentous or calamitous, is likely to happen  (13, 28)
  • portentous — done in a pompously or overly solemn manner so as to impress; also foreshadowing  (26, 14; 49, 3; 79, 3)
  • portico — a structure consisting of a roof supported by columns at regular intervals, typically attached as a porch to a building  (102, 15; 172, 28; 173, 19)
  • potent — having great power, influence, or effect; mighty, formidable  (155, 6)
  • precarious — not securely held or in position; dangerously likely to fall or collapse; insecure, unreliable  (149, 15; 182, 19)
  • precedence — the condition of being considered more important than someone or something else; priority in importance, order, or rank  (117, 33; 122, 6)
  • precinct — the area within the walls or perceived boundaries of a particular building or place; confines, limits  (86, 33)
  • precipice — a very steep rock face or cliff, especially a tall one  (80, 17; 81, 10; 81, 11; 217, 36)
  • precipitated — caused to move suddenly and with force; hurled, catapulted  (62, 8; 167, 21; 189, 16)
  • precipitately – occurring suddenly or abruptly; rapidly, meteoric  (115, 18)
  • precipitous — dangerously high, steep and forbidding  (105, 3; 105, 5)
  • precipitously — in a dangerously high or steep manner  (55, 2)
  • precocity — developing certain abilities or proclivities at an earlier age than usual, advanced, forward-looking, wise beyond one’s years  (31, 28)
  • predecessor — a person who held a job or office before the current holder  (132, 3)
  • predetermined — established or decided in advance; prearranged, preestablished  (71, 37)
  • preeminent — surpassing all others; very distinguished in some way; leading, foremost  (75, 32; 88, 31; 102, 29)
  • preface — introduce or begin a speech or an event with or by doing something  (149, 19)
  • prefigure — be an early indication or version of something; imagine beforehand  (54, 18)
  • pregnant — full of meaning; significant or suggestive; fraught, charged, teeming  (70, 13)
  • prejudice — preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience  (4, 7; 90, 40; 93, 29; 162, 36)
  • premeditation — the action of planning something, especially a crime, beforehand  (169, 34)
  • preponderance — the quality or fact of being greater in number, quantity, or importance; dominance  (84, 37)
  • prerogative — a right or privilege exclusive to a particular individual or class; entitlement, advantage  (70, 19)
  • presumption — an idea that is taken to be true, and often used as the basis for other ideas, although it is not known for certain; a belief or thought  (62, 30)
  • presumptuous — the state of a person or their behavior failing to observe the limits of what is permitted or appropriate  (137, 37; 223, 11)
  • presumptuously —  in a manner that fails to observe the limits of what is permitted or appropriate; arrogantly, egotistically  (77, 15)
  • pretension — a claim or assertion of a claim to something  (11, 20; 13, 29)
  • pretentious — attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, or culture than is actually possessed; ostentatious  (220, 20)
  • prevalence — the situation of being widespread in a particular area or at a particular time; prevailing  (137, 20)
  • prevalent — widespread in a particular area or at a particular time; widespread, prevailing  (199, 3)
  • prima facie — based on the first impression; accepted as correct until proved otherwise  (45, 1; 176, 12)
  • primeval — of or resembling the earliest ages in the history of the world; earliest, first, antique  (203, 27)
  • princeling — a young prince  (132, 13; 180, 11)
  • proclivity — a tendency to choose or do something regularly; an inclination or predisposition toward a particular thing  (10, 20)
  • procurable — capable of being obtained or acquired  (82, 4)
  • procurator — an agent representing others in a court of law in countries retaining Roman civil law  (34, 10; 48, 18; 143, 39)
  • procure — obtain something, especially with care or effort  (86, 19; 182, 35; 186, 8)
  • prodigality — the inclination to spend money or resources freely and recklessly; the proclivity to be wastefully extravagant  (17, 23)
  • prodigies — impressive or outstanding examples of a particular quality; epitomes  (106, 33)
  • prodigious — remarkably or impressively great in extent, size, or degree, huge, colossal  (15, 38)
  • profane — not respectful of orthodox religious practice; irreverent, vile  (33, 41; 86, 33; 200, 23; 201, 5)
  • profaning — speaking in vile or irreverent language, showing disrespect for sacred or holy things  (91, 2)
  • proffered — held out something to someone for acceptance; offer  (152, 8)
  • profligacy — licentious or dissolute behavior; lasciviousness  (141, 2)
  • profound — very great or intense; keen, extreme  (107. 33; 200, 28)
  • profundity — deep insight; great depth of knowledge or thought; sagacity, intelligence  (61, 16)
  • prohibitions — the action of forbidding something, especially by law; banning, barring  (204, 16)
  • proleptic — in a state of anticipating and answering possible objections in rhetorical speech  (49, 28)
  • promiscuous — having or characterized by many transient sexual relationships; licentious, debauched  (119, 8; 125, 2; 150, 21)
  • promulgation — the act of promoting or making an idea or cause widely known; publicizing  (119, 25)
  • promptitude — the quality of acting quickly and without delay  (118, 17)
  • propitiate — win or regain the favor of by doing something that pleases them; appease, placate  (213, 7)
  • proposition — a statement or assertion that expresses a judgment or opinion; a premise or postulation  (40, 22)
  • proprieties — the details or rules of behavior conventionally considered to be correct  (218, 19)
  • proselytes — persons who have converted from one opinion, religion, or party to another; recruits  (85, 28; 108, 41; 127, 30)
  • prostrate — lying stretched out on the ground with one’s face downward; overwhelmed, overpowered  (69, 34)
  • prostration — the state of being extremely weak or subservient; a state of collapse, weakness, debility  (174, 3)
  • prototype — a first, typical or preliminary model of something, especially a machine, from which other forms are developed or copied  (182, 27)
  • protract — prolong, draw out, extend, lengthen  (147, 29)
  • proverbial — well known, especially so as to be stereotypical; famous, time-honored  (70, 41)
  • providence — the protective care of God or of nature as a spiritual power  (78, 36; 154, 23; 154, 29)
  • provincial — concerning the regions outside the capitol city of a country, especially when regarded as unsophisticated or narrow-minded  (37, 18; 104, 13; 217, 17)
  • provincials — as a noun, those who live in regions outside the capitol city, often considered unsophisticated and uneducated  (114, 9)
  • prow — the portion of a ship’s bow above water  (187, 35)
  • prowl — to move around restlessly and stealthily, especially in search of or as if in search of prey  (85, 8)
  • proximity — nearness in space, time, or relationship  (57, 41)
  • prudence — sound judgement, sagacity, wisdom, cautiousness  (31, 25; 114, 27
  • publican — a person who owns or manages a pub, or a collector of taxes  (161, 9; 200, 6)
  • puerile — childishly silly and trivial  (27, 2; 41, 13)
  • puerilities — childish and silly activities or endeavors, foolish acts  (50, 40)
  • purged — to have rid someone or something of an unwanted quality, condition, or feeling  (125, 34; 133, 28)
  • purification — the process of making something or someone ceremonially clean  (91, 5; 93, 5)
  • Purim — a Jewish festival held in spring to commemorate the defeat of Haman’s plot to massacre the Jews, recorded in the book of Esther  (173, 27)

Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q

  • quail — feel or show fear or apprehension; cower, cringe  (184, 4)
  • qualms — uneasy feelings of doubt, worry, or fear, especially about one’s own conduct; misgivings, apprehensions  (110, 25)
  • quarantine — a state, period, or place of isolation in which people or animals that have arrived from elsewhere or been exposed to infectious or contagious disease are placed  (138, 25)
  • queenly — fit for or appropriate to a queen; dignified, elevating  (76, 23)
  • quench — stifle or suppress a feeling  (190, 4; 193, 26; 216, 22)
  • quenched — satisfied, slaked, sated, satiated  (97, 32; 174, 15)
  • querulous — complaining in a petulant or whining manner; being petty or complaining  (92, 37; 95, 15; 162, 13)
  • quintessence — the most perfect or typical example of a quality or class; stereotype, epitome  (210, 14)
  • quixotic — exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical
  • quondam — that once was; former  (181, 6)

R-R-R-R-R-R-R-R

  • rabble — a disorderly crowd; a mob, a swarm, a horde  (197, 3)
  • racking— causing extreme physical or mental pain to; subjecting to extreme stress  (110, 25)
  • raiment — clothing, garb  (223, 19)
  • rapture — a feeling of intense pleasure or joy  (1, 16; 73, 15; 108, 38)
  • rash — displaying or proceeding from a lack of careful consideration of the possible consequences of an action; reckless, impetuous  (92, 6)
  • ratifying — signing or giving formal consent to a treaty, contract, or agreement, making it officially valid  (53, 9)
  • rationalistic —  of the opinion that opinions and actions should be based on reason and knowledge rather than on religious belief or emotions  (78, 13; 154, 34)
  • raved — talked wildly or incoherently, as if one were delirious or insane  (109, 23)
  • ravel — confuse or complicate a question or situation; obfuscate, bewilder  (147, 17)
  • raving — speaking in a wild, irrational or incoherent manner; ranting  (109, 28)
  • ravings — wild, irrational, or incoherent talk; gibberish, rantings  (109, 16; 113, 5)
  • reassert — to restate a fact or belief confidently and forcefully  (56, 14)
  • rebellious — showing a desire to resist authority, control, or convention; defiant, unruly  (103, 33)
  • reckless — without thinking or caring about the consequences of an action; rash, careless  (51, 27)
  • reckon — consider or regard in a specified way  (59, 3)
  • recluse — a person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid other people  (49, 29)
  • recoil — suddenly spring or flinch back in fear, horror, or disgust  (117, 37)
  • recompense — compensation or reward given for loss or harm suffered or effort made  (210, 28)
  • reconcile — restore friendly relations between; cause to coexist in harmony; make or show to be compatible  (208, 23)
  • rectitude — morally correct behavior or thinking; righteousness; goodness, virtue  (202, 23)
  • recumbent — lying down, horizontal, flat  (137, 9)
  • redemption — the action of saving or being saved from sin, error, or evil; absolution, saving  (48, 7)
  • reek — smell strongly and unpleasantly; stink  (58, 15; 71, 30)
  • refuge — something or somewhere providing shelter; protection  (49, 12)
  • refute — proved to be wrong or false; disprove  (131, 19)
  • regal — of, resembling, or fit for a monarch, especially in being magnificent or dignified; majestic  (121, 14)
  • regenerate — bring into renewed existence; generate again, revitalize, restore  (38, 11; 71, 23; 123, 15)
  • reiterate — to say something again or a number of times, hoping to add clarity or emphasis  (203, 23)
  • reiteration — the saying of something again or a number of times, typically for emphasis or clarity  (92, 41; 216, 30)
  • rejuvenescent — renewed in both youth and vitality; energized  (71, 24)
  • relent — abandon or mitigate a harsh intention or cruel treatment;  back down  (131, 34)
  • religionism — excessive religious zeal  (117, 41)
  • remand — a committal to custody; reincarceration  (181, 40)
  • remediable — capable of being cured or rectified; treatable  (37, 27)
  • rend — tear (something) into two or more pieces; split, rupture  (155, 31)
  • renegade — a person who deserts and betrays an organization, country, or set of principles; traitor, turncoat  (208, 26)
  • renouncing — formally declaring one’s abandonment of a claim, right, or possession  (108, 39)
  • renovated — restored to a good state of repair and functionality  (163, 14)
  • renovation — the action of remodeling or restoring  (175, 37)
  • renunciation — the formal rejection of something, typically a belief, claim, or course of action  (64, 32)
  • repel — be repulsive or distasteful to; sicken, disgust  (187, 20)
  • repellent — causing disgust or distaste; repulsive, disgusting  (76, 19)
  • repose — a state of rest, sleep, or tranquility; stillness  (69, 32; 96, 23; 111, 10; 121, 12; 125, 3; 128, 18; 151, 5; 187, 27)
  • reproach — address someone in such a way as to express disapproval or disappointment  (34, 4; 139, 37; 143, 9; 185, 26; 193, 22; 198, 6; 202, 19; 205, 3; 209, 16; 221, 3; 221, 4)
  • reproachful — expressing disapproval or disappointment; critical  (93, 20)
  • reprobate — an unprincipled person; a rogue or scoundrel  (40, 31)
  • reprobation — disapproval, condemnation, or censure  (210, 12)
  • repudiate — refuse to accept or be associated with; renounce, reject  (58, 22; 184, 14; 210, 31; 218, 27)
  • repugnant — extremely distasteful; unacceptable; revolting, disgusting  (40, 26; 69, 12)
  • repulsive — arousing intense distaste or disgust; revolting, abhorrent  (68, 13; 166, 1; 202, 24)
  • repute — the opinion generally held of someone or something; the state of being regarded in a particular way; name, character  (96, 31)
  • requisite — made necessary by particular circumstances or regulations; required, essential  (149, 24)
  • respectability — the state or quality of being proper, correct, and socially acceptable  (137, 40; 140, 18)
  • restitution — the restoration of something to its original state  (163, 26)
  • retard — to slow the progress or growth of something  (187, 30; 193, 6)
  • reticence — the trait of not revealing one’s thoughts or feelings readily  (7, 4; 7, 17; 25, 14)
  • retribution — punishment inflicted on someone as vengeance for a wrong or criminal act; penalty, doom  (79, 29)
  • reveler — a person who is enjoying themselves in a lively and noisy way; party-goer  (183, 21)
  • reverence — deep respect for someone or something; admiration, esteem  (117, 28; 203, 29)
  • revivify — give new life or vigor to; energize  (71, 23)
  • revolting — causing intense disgust; disgusting  (176, 3)
  • revulsion — a sense of disgust and loathing; disgust, repugnance  (215, 39)
  • rhetorician — a speaker whose words are primarily intended to impress or persuade  (124, 6)
  • rhythmic — pulsing, metrical, measure, dealing with beat and rhythm  (134, 36)
  • riband — ribbon  (144, 3; 165, 1)
  • rife — commonly occurring, widespread, full of  (18, 23; 185, 16)
  • rifted — broken apart, separated, divided  (190, 7)
  • rill — a small stream; a small amount  (211, 32)
  • riotous — characterized by wild and uncontrolled behavior; boisterous, unrestrained  (201, 17)
  • rite — a religious or other solemn ceremony or act  (54, 8)
  • ritualism — the regular observance or practice of ritual, especially when excessive or without regard to its function  (41, 6; 220, 11)
  • riven — split or torn apart violently; severed  (57, 11)
  • rivulet — a very small stream  (81, 38)
  • ruddy —  having a healthy red or reddish color  (3, 35; 12, 18)
  • ruffian — a violent person, especially one involved in crime; villain, rogue  (118, 18)
  • ruffle — disconcert or upset the composure of someone; vex, exasperate  (153, 25)
  • ruinous — disastrous or destructive; calamitous  (64, 28; 141, 20; 141, 24; 181, 8)
  • rupture — a breach of a harmonious relationship; a rift, a breach  (136, 15)
  • ruthless — having or showing no pity or compassion for others; heartless, merciless  (105, 17)

S-S-S-S-S-S-S-S

  • sabbatic — of or appropriate to the sabbath  (195, 18)
  • sacerdotal — relating to priests or the priesthood; priestly  (88, 36; 199, 12; 211, 10; 218, 34)
  • sacrament — a thing of mysterious and sacred significance; a religious symbol  (69, 15)
  • sacrilegious — profane, blasphemous, impious, irreverent  (11, 14; 88, 5)
  • sacristan — the person in charge of a room in a church where a priest prepares for a service, and where vestments and other things used in worship are kept  (102, 32)
  • sanctifying — making legitimate or binding by religious sanction; freeing from sin, purifying  (43, 31)
  • sanctimonious — making a show of being morally superior to other people, self-righteous, conceited  (209, 34)
  • sanction — give official permission or approval for an action  (59, 18; 79, 22)
  • sanctions — threatened penalties for disobeying a law or rule  (37, 33)
  • sanctity — the state or quality of being holy, sacred, or saintly; godliness, blessedness  (204, 19)
  • sanguinary — involving or causing much bloodshed  (19, 17; 104, 38; 203, 26)
  • Sanhedrin — the supreme council and tribunal of the Jews during postexilic times headed by a High Priest and having religious, civil, and criminal authority  (91, 34; 91, 36)
  • sarcophagus — a stone coffin, adorned with a sculpture or inscription, associated with the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Rome, and Greece  (33, 22)
  • sate — satisfy a desire or an appetite to the full; slake, quench  (206, 17)
  • satiety — the state of having a desire or appetite satisfied to the fullest  (49, 23)
  • saturnalia — an occasion of wild revelry, a wild and raucous festival  (171, 19)
  • saturnine — slow, gloomy, melancholic, morose  (143, 24)
  • satyr — one of a class of lustful, drunken woodland gods, often represented with horns and large ears  (55, 8; 133, 16)
  • savage — fierce, violent, and uncontrolled, ferocious  (98, 14)
  • savants — learned persons, especially distinguished scientists; intellectuals  (77, 19)
  • scandalize — shock, outrage, or horrify someone by a real or imagined violation of propriety or morality  (181, 2)
  • scanty — small or insufficient in quantity or amount; meager, minimal  (45, 14; 49, 8; 142, 33)
  • scathe — harm; injure  (78, 23)
  • scathing — harmful, piercing, injurious  (88, 6; 158, 2)
  • scepter — an ornamented staff carried by rulers on ceremonial occasions as a symbol of sovereignty  (48, 17; 67, 14)
  • scholastic — of or concerning schools and education  (56, 40)
  • scope — the extent of the area or subject matter that something deals with or to which it is relevant; range, breadth  (129, 20)
  • scorn — contempt, derision, mockery  (218, 28)
  • scornful — contemptuous, derisive, mocking, withering  (200, 34)
  • scourge — a whip used as an instrument of punishment; a lash, a strap  (87, 15; 186, 5)
  • scruples — a feeling of doubt or hesitation with regard to the morality or propriety of a course of action  (121, 1; 182, 17)
  • scrupulosity — having the tendency to be diligent, thorough, and extremely attentive to details  (84, 20; 120, 6; 161, 19; 174, 12; 206, 31; 218, 19; 220, 26)
  • scrupulous — discerning, diligent, thorough, careful, meticulous  (114, 4; 122, 32; 177, 37; 199, 24; 200, 10; 203, 33)
  • scrupulously — diligently, thoroughly, extremely carefully  (107, 20)
  • scrupulousness — diligence, careful consideration, thoroughness, discernment  (144, 5)
  • scorn — the feeling or belief that someone or something is worthless or despicable; contempt  (51, 2; 87, 13)
  • scrip — paper money in amounts of less than a dollar  (168, 34)
  • scruples — a feeling of doubt or hesitation with regard to the morality or propriety of a course of action;  qualms  (127, 21)
  • seclusion — the state of being private and away from other people, privacy  (53, 14; 108, 37; 111, 20)
  • sect — a group of people with somewhat different religious beliefs, typically regarded as heretical, from those of a larger group to which they belong  (91, 29; 92, 8)
  • seditious — inciting or causing people to rebel against the authority of a state or monarch  (89, 19)
  • seductive — tempting and attractive; enticing; alluring  (62, 33)
  • seemly — conforming to accepted notions of propriety or good taste; decorous; proper, decent  (86, 24)
  • self-contradictory — inconsist between aspects or parts of a whole  (89, 17)
  • self-loathing — a feeling of intense dislike, disgust, or hatred directed to oneself  (112, 40)
  • semblance — the outward appearance or apparent form of something, especially when the reality is different  (55, 15; 57, 16; 64, 27; 145, 38; 221, 25)
  • sensibility — the ability to appreciate and respond to complex emotional or aesthetic influences; sensitivity  (91, 32; 128, 36)
  • sensual — relating to or involving gratification of the senses and physical, especially sexual, pleasure  (68, 21)
  • sensuality — the enjoyment, expression, or pursuit of physical, especially sexual, pleasure  (180, 30; 183, 1)
  • sensuous — attractive or gratifying physically, especially sexually  (60, 14; 62, 18)
  • sententious — given to moralizing in a pompous or affected manner  (40, 6)
  • separatist — a person who supports the separation of a particular group of people from a larger body on the basis of ethnicity, religion, or gender  (177, 37)
  • sepulcher — a small room or monument, cut in rock or built of stone, in which a dead person is laid or buried; tomb, vault  (221, 6; 221, 29)
  • sequel — something that takes place after or as a result of an earlier event; an outcome, a development  (93, 32)
  • serene — calm, peaceful, and untroubled; tranquil  (118, 22)
  • serpentine — complex, cunning, or treacherous, convoluted, complicated  (216, 23)
  • servile — having or showing an excessive willingness to serve or please others  (51, 14; 64, 7; 122, 3; 182, 9)
  • servitor — a person who serves or attends on a social superior  (11, 18)
  • servitude — the state of being a slave or completely subject to someone more powerful; bondage, subjugation  (113, 39)
  • severity — seriousness, gravity, at time harshness  (123, 4)
  • shadow — used in reference to something insubstantial or fleeting  (196, 6)
  • shambles — a state of total disorder; chaos, disarray  (87, 7)
  • Shechinah — a Hebrew word meaning “dwelling” or “settling” and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God  (44, 17)
  • sheer — perpendicular or nearly so, especially of a cliff or wall; precipitous, abrupt  (62, 3)
  • shrouded — covered or enveloped so as to conceal from view  (60, 14; 102, 24; 119, 30)
  • shuddering —  trembling convulsively, typically as a result of fear or revulsion  (216, 1)
  • sidereal — of or with respect to the distant star  (13, 19)
  • signal — striking in extent, seriousness, or importance; outstanding; noteworthy  (141, 26; 185, 40)
  • signalized — marked or indicated, especially in a striking or conspicuous manner  (107, 9; 207, 9)
  • siliceous — containing or consisting of silica  (59, 37)
  • similitude — the quality or state of being similar to something; resemblance, likeness  (150, 34)
  • simple-minded — having or showing very little intelligence or judgment; uninformed  (70, 14)
  • simulacrum — an unsatisfactory imitation or substitute  (57, 16; 167, 14)
  • simulated — pretended, feigned, imitated  (135, 36)
  • skeptic — a person inclined to question or doubt accepted opinions  (77, 24)
  • skeptical — questioning, doubting, being unsure of  (104, 24)
  • skepticism — a skeptical attitude; doubt as to the truth of something  (78, 15)
  • sloth — reluctance to work or make an effort; laziness  (40, 26)
  • slough — a situation characterized by lack of progress or activity; a swamp  (62, 21)
  • sluggish — lacking energy or alertness, inactive  (55, 3)
  • slur — an insinuation or allegation about someone that is likely to insult them or damage their reputation; slander, libel  (104, 11)
  • smolder — show or feel barely suppressed anger, hatred, or another powerful emotion; seethe, fume  (95, 1)
  • sneer — smile or speak in a contemptuous or mocking manner  (78, 24)
  • solemn — not cheerful or smiling; serious; grave, sober  (185, 25)
  • solemnity — the state or quality of being serious and dignified; majesty  (82, 16; 103, 19; 209, 10; 216, 28)
  • solitary — isolated, alone, without companionship  (73, 14)
  • solitude — the state or situation of being alone; isolation  (51, 32; 193, 10)
  • sophism — a fallacious argument, especially one used deliberately to deceive  (216, 7)
  • sorcery — the use of magic, especially black magic  (44, 6)
  • sorer — more severe, more harsh, more painful  (57, 34)
  • soured — having become acrimonious or difficult; grouchy  (135, 34)
  • sovereign — possessing supreme or ultimate power; absolute  (200, 14)
  • sovereignty — supreme power or authority; dominion, power  (154, 28)
  • spasm — a sudden and brief spell of an activity or sensation  (73, 22; 110, 25; 201, 18)
  • specious — superficially plausible, but actually wrong; misleading in appearance  (221, 17)
  • specter — something widely feared as a possible unpleasant or dangerous occurrence; a ghost  (58, 14)
  • speculation — the forming of a theory or conjecture without firm evidence, conjecture  (49, 7; 185, 15)
  • spikenard — a costly perfumed ointment much valued in ancient times  (137, 28)
  • spoil — goods stolen or taken forcibly from a person or place  (118, 29)
  • spontaneity — the condition of being spontaneous; spontaneous behavior or action  (126, 7; 166, 27)
  • spur — a projection from a mountain or mountain range  (99, 12)
  • spurious — not being what it purports to be; false or fake  (5, 39; 20, 21; 192, 21; 201, 13; 221, 25)
  • squalid — describing a place that is extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect; filthy, slum-like  (129, 24; 141, 24)
  • squalor — the state of being extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect; filth  (146, 3)
  • squander — waste something, especially money or time, in a reckless and foolish manner; throw away, dissipate  (201, 17)
  • stagnant — showing no activity; dull and sluggish; lethargic  (58, 15)
  • stainlessness — the state of being unmarked by or resistant to stains or discoloration; purity  (75, 33)
  • stark — severe or bare in appearance or outline  (82, 2)
  • starry — full of or lit by stars, brilliant, glowing  (69, 13; 69, 40)
  • startling — very surprising, astonishing, or remarkable; amazing, unexpected  (195, 27)
  • stately — dignified, majestic, courtly, impressive  (77, 32)
  • steeped — surrounded by or filled with a quality or influence  (20, 36)
  • steersman —  a person who is steering a boat or ship  (153, 2)
  • stench — a strong and very unpleasant smell; a stink, an effluvium  (86, 37)
  • sterility — the quality or condition of being without imagination, creativity, or excitement; uninspiring or unproductive  (170, 22)
  • stern — serious and unrelenting, especially in the assertion of authority and exercise of discipline; severe, forbidding  (50, 1; 51, 31; 79, 29; 103, 11; 125, 14; 185, 26; 189, 34; 199, 23; 217, 14; 218, 32; 223, 1)
  • stifle — restrain a reaction or stop oneself acting on an emotion  (150, 34)
  • stigma — a mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person  (38, 2; 207, 27)
  • stinted — restrict someone or something in the amount of something, especially money, given or permitted  (60, 41)
  • stolid — impassive, phlegmatic, calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation  (93, 41; 99, 33; 203, 39; 207, 28)
  • strain — the tenor, pervading note, burden, or tone of an utterance or of a course of action or conduct  (202, 3)
  • strand — the shore of a sea, lake, or large river; shoreline, coast  (118, 24)
  • stupendous — extremely impressive  (ix, 26; 6, 4; 104, 19; 125, 22; 153, 39; 155, 1; 175, 21; 191, 39)
  • subjective — based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions; personal; emotional  (56, 29; 149, 1)
  • subjugation — the state of being a slave or completely subject to someone more powerful; bondage  (114, 1)
  • sublimest — of such excellence, grandeur, or beauty as to inspire, to the greatest degree, great admiration or awe  (89, 39; 146, 24)
  • subordinate — lower in rank or position or authority  (128, 3)
  • subordinates — a person under the authority or control of another within an organization; junior, number two  (114, 11)
  • subservience — the quality of obeying others without questioning; servile, submissive  (52, 5)
  • subsistence — the action or fact of maintaining or supporting oneself at a minimum level; survival  (49, 8)
  • substructions — underlying or supporting structures  (88, 38)
  • subterfuge — deceit used in order to achieve one’s goal; trickery, deception  (191, 21)
  • subtle — making use of clever and indirect methods to achieve something; toned down, subdued  (60, 14; 61, 26)
  • subtlety — the state of not being obvious or over-stated  (60, 5; 61, 36; 63, 9)
  • suckle — to feed a baby or young animal from the breast or teat  (18, 3)
  • suffice — be enough or adequate; meet the needs of  (144, 19)
  • suffused — gradually spread through or over; infiltrated, permeated  (124, 24)
  • sullen — bad-tempered and sulky; gloomy; surly, glum  (91, 18)
  • sulphurous — containing or derived from sulphur; marked by bad temper, anger, or profanity  (50, 29)
  • sultry — hot and humid; stuffy, suffocating  (80, 18; 81, 16; 151, 3)
  • sumptuous — splendid and expensive-looking; luxurious, lavish  (181, 11; 182, 37)
  • sundered — split apart, divided  (163, 16)
  • supersede — take the place of a person or thing previously in authority or use; supplant; replace  (178, 32)
  • supercilious — behaving or looking as though one thinks one is superior to others, haughty, conceited  (30, 12; 40, 9; 50, 37; 139, 3; 220, 14)
  • supererogation — the performance of more work than duty requires  (162, 18)
  • superfluity — an unnecessarily or excessively large amount or number of something; excess, overabundance  (174, 26; 211, 12)
  • superfluous — unnecessary, especially through being more than enough  (17, 23; 56, 22; 56, 23; 191, 21; 220, 12)
  • superiority — supremacy, advantage, dominance  (135, 16)
  • supernatural — attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature; occult, mystical, magical  (106, 31; 112, 38; 154, 20)
  • supersede — take the place of a person or thing previously in authority or use; supplant; replace  (56, 2)
  • superstition — a widely held but unjustified belief in supernatural causation leading to certain consequences of an action or event, or a practice based on such a belief; myth  (174, 28)
  • superstitious — having or showing a belief in a widely held but unjustified belief in supernatural causation leading to certain consequences of an action or event, or a practice based on such a belief  (120, 7; 181, 20; 185, 36)
  • supineness — the state of failing to act or protest as a result of moral weakness or indolence  (91, 5)
  • supple — bending and moving easily and gracefully; flexible  (48, 20; 83, 39)
  • suppliant — a person making a humble plea to someone in power or authority; beggar, applicant  (97, 34)
  • supposition — an uncertain belief  (12, 36; 57, 33; 70, 25)
  • suppressed — prevented the development, action, or expression of a feeling, impulse, or idea; restrained; stifled  (101, 34)
  • sustenance — food and drink regarded as a source of strength; nourishment  (196, 28)
  • swayed — controlled or influenced; persuaded, affected  (109, 9)
  • sycophancy — obsequious behavior toward someone important in order to gain advantage  (176, 15)
  • sycophant — a person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage;  a toady, a fawner  (20, 18)
  • symbolism — the use of symbols or figures to represent ideas or qualities  (196, 17)
  • symbolized –represent, stand for, exemplify, denote  (89, 29)
  • symmetrical — made up of exactly similar parts facing each other or around an axis; showing symmetry; uniform, consistent  (189, 2)
  • synchronize — coordinate; combine  (168, 10)
  • Synoptical gospels — the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, which describe events from a similar point of view, as contrasted with that of John  (65, 4; 102, 1)

T-T-T-T-T-T-T-T

  • tacitly — in a manner to be understood or implied without being stated  (199, 16)
  • Talmud — the body of Jewish civil and ceremonial law and legend   (72, 13; 210, 22)
  • taunt — a remark made in order to anger, wound, or provoke someone; a jeer, a jibe  (61, 9; 217, 38)
  • taunting –intended to provoke someone in an insulting or contemptuous manner  (104, 23)
  • tedium — monotony, dullness, boredom  (33, 21)
  • teem — to be full of or swarming with  (32, 2)
  • temperament — a person’s or animal’s nature, especially as it permanently affects their behavior  (8, 2; 162, 28; 201, 12)
  • temperance — abstinence from alcoholic drink; abstinence, abstention  (59, 20; 181, 27)
  • temperately — showing moderation or self-restraint  (78, 27)
  • tempestuous — characterized by strong and turbulent or conflicting emotion, stormy, violent  (153, 14; 190, 6)
  • tempter — a person or thing that entices or persuades, often to do something wrong or illegal  (56, 37; 59, 26)
  • tenant — occupy property as a tenant or renter or leaser  (133, 15)
  • tentative — not certain or fixed; provisional; preliminary  (94, 7)
  • terebinth — a small southern European tree of the cashew family that was formerly a source of turpentine  (47, 5; 67, 2)
  • terse — sparing in the use of words; abrupt; curt, brusque  (126, 37; 201, 5)
  • tetrarch — in the Roman Empire, the governor of one of four divisions of a country or province  (48, 18; 184, 5; 185, 11; 208, 30)
  • thaumaturge — a worker of wonders and performer of miracles; a magician  (77, 26; 174, 8)
  • thenceforth — from that time, place, or point onward  (197, 32)
  • theocratic — relating to or denoting a system of government in which priests rule in the name of God or a god  (131, 14; 171, 9)
  • theologian — a person who engages or is an expert in the field of religious or ecclesiastical matters  (94, 7)
  • theological — relating to the study of things religious or ecclesiastical  (56, 40)
  • theosophy — philosophies maintaining that a knowledge of God may be achieved through spiritual ecstasy, direct intuition, or individual relations  (40, 38)
  • thraldom — the state of being under the control of another person; bondage, slavery  (71, 28; 156, 40)
  • throes — intense or violent pain and struggle, especially accompanying birth, death, or great change; agony, pain  (48, 28; 217, 11)
  • thronged — rushed, streamed, surged, flocked  (112, 11)
  • thwart — prevent someone from accomplishing something, stand in the way of, stymie  (166, 33; 208, 7)
  • timbral — a tambourine or similar instrument  (33, 21)
  • timid — showing a lack of courage or confidence; easily frightened  (55, 14; 122, 30)
  • timidities — inclinations toward lack of courage or confidence; hesitancies  (51, 12; 91, 6)
  • timidity — the tendency to show a lack of courage or confidence; easily frightened  (92, 1; 92, 2; 92, 10; 182, 17)
  • tincture — a medicine made by dissolving a drug in alcohol, or a slight trace of something  (40, 8)
  • tinge — have a slight influence on; imbue slightly with a feeling or quality; to color slightly  (9, 1; 34, 41)
  • titular — holding or constituting a purely formal position or title without any real authority; ceremonial  (132, 13)
  • toiler — worker, laborer, employee  (190, 13)
  • toilsome — involving hard or tedious work  (3, 36; 121, 16)
  • torpor — a state of physical or mental inactivity; lethargy  (18, 10)
  • torrent — a sudden, violent, and copious outpouring of something, typically words or feelings; outburst, volley  (220, 33)
  • tortuous — full of twists and turns; convoluted, undulating  (105, 12)
  • trafficking — dealing or trading in something illegal  (86, 22)
  • traitor — a person who betrays a friend, country, or principle; a renegade  (198, 8)
  • transcend — be or go beyond the range or limits of something abstract, typically a conceptual field or division  (77, 13; 107, 27; 108, 35)
  • transcendent — beyond or above the range of normal or merely physical human experience, exceptional, preeminent  (35, 34; 39, 19; 154, 21)
  • transcendental — relating to a spiritual or nonphysical realm  (58, 10)
  • transcendently — in a manner beyond or above the range of normal human experience; exceptional  (185, 34; 202, 13)
  • transfiguration — a complete change of form or appearance into a more beautiful or spiritual state  (117, 8)
  • transfigured — transform into something more beautiful or elevated; change, alter  (80, 3)
  • transformation — a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance; change, variation, revision  (114, 41)
  • transient — lasting only for a short time; impermanent  (20, 9; 101, 37; 148, 4; 148, 10)
  • transitory — not permanent; transient, temporary  (43, 4; 94, 28; 120, 28)
  • translucence — the quality of allowing light, but not detailed shapes, to pass through; semitransparent  (ix, 18)
  • transparent — easy to perceive or detect; obvious, clear, lucid  (61, 26)
  • transport — an overwhelmingly strong emotion; rhapsody, passion  (87, 30)
  • travail — painful or laborious effort  (4, 24)
  • traverse — travel across or through  (190, 16)
  • treacherous — guilty of or involving betrayal or deception; disloyal, perfidious  (91, 26; 180, 22; 220, 21)
  • treachery — betrayal of trust; deceptive action or nature; disloyalty  (95, 17)
  • treatise — a written work dealing formally and systematically with a subject; disquisition, essay, paper  (209, 26)
  • tresses — long locks or strands of a woman’s hair  (64, 18)
  • trigon — a triangular region or area  (14, 16)
  • trivial — of little value or importance  (7, 12; 178, 11)
  • truism — a statement that is obviously true and says nothing new or interesting  (58, 27)
  • tumult — confusion or disorder  (4, 8; 111, 17; 126, 29)
  • twilight — a period or state of obscurity, ambiguity, or gradual decline; waning, ebb  (114, 1)
  • tyrannous — relating to cruel and oppressive government or rule  (44, 5; 134, 10; 174, 29; 175, 17)
  • tyranny — cruel and oppressive government or rule; despotism  (71, 33; 88, 34; 156, 15; 204, 31)
  • tyrant — a cruel, unreasonable, and oppressive ruler  (11, 14; 181, 12)
  • type — a person, thing, or event considered as a representative of a class or group  (120, 29)

U-U-U-U-U-U-U-U

  • umbrageous — annoying, offensive, irritating  (24, 9)
  • unalloyed — metal that is pure, or relating to emotions that are complete and unreserved  (41, 10)
  • unanimity — agreement by all people involved; consensus; accord, togetherness  (158, 31)
  • unanimous — fully in agreement, united  (55, 25)
  • unapproachable — remote and inaccessible; beyond reach, remote  (71, 15; 150, 40)
  • unbared — to have made known or understandable  (98, 7)
  • unbounded — having or appearing to have no limits  (19, 6)
  • uncandid — not truthful, not straightforward, not frank  (44, 41)
  • unchronological — relating to a record of events that does not start with the earliest event and does not follow the order in which they occurred  (102, 5)
  • uncompromising — showing an unwillingness to make concessions to others, especially by changing one’s ways or opinions  (53, 22)
  • underling — a person lower in status or rank  (175, 1)
  • undermine — lessen the effectiveness, power, or ability of, especially gradually or insidiously; threaten, weaken, compromise  (210, 39)
  • undiminished — not reduced or lessened  (76, 33)
  • undulating – having a smoothly rising and falling form or outline  (115, 17)
  • unfathomable — incapable of being fully explored or understood; incomprehensible  (6, 28; 35, 41; 43, 33; 115, 8)
  • ungracious — not polite or friendly; discourteous, ill-mannered  (136, 26)
  • unhallowed — not officially consecrated, unholy; wicked  (138, 15)
  • unilluminated — uninspired, commonplace  (6, 2)
  • unimaginative — not readily using or demonstrating the use of the imagination; stolid and somewhat dull; uninspired, uninventive  (97, 28)
  • unimpeachable — not able to be doubted, questioned, or criticized; entirely trustworthy  (7, 27)
  • unintelligible — impossible to understand; incomprehensible  (92, 39)
  • universality — applicable to all cases or situations; all-encompassing  (60, 5)
  • unmask — expose the true character of or hidden truth about  (53, 23)
  • unobtrusive — not conspicuous or attracting attention  (77, 11)
  • unpurged — not cleansed or cleared of impurities  (54, 23)
  • unquailing — feeling or showing absolutely no fear or apprehension  (51, 7; 132, 35)
  • unquenchable — not able to be extinguished or put out  (52, 35)
  • unrelenting — not yielding in strength, severity, or determination; implacable, unbending  (184, 13)
  • unreproved — not being reprimanded, censured, or rebuked  (138, 5)
  • unreservedly — without hesitance or reservation; enthusiastically  (63, 38)
  • unruffled — not disordered or disarranged, calm, smooth, placid  (39, 11)
  • unscrupulous — having or showing no moral principles; not honest or fair; unprincipled, unfair  (22, 26)
  • unseemly —  not proper or appropriate; unbecoming, unbefitting  (112, 12)
  • unshorn — uncut, long haired  (84, 10)
  • unslaked — not quenched or satisfied  (21, 10)
  • unsullied — not spoiled or made impure, untarnished, unblemished  (148, 5)
  • unteazled — fabric that has not had a nap raised on, with or as if with teasels  (163, 9)
  • untenable — not able to be maintained or defended against attack or objection; indefensible  (199, 16)
  • untenanted — not occupied by a tenant or tenants, uninhabited  (51, 36)
  • untrammeled — not deprived of freedom of action or expression; not restricted or hampered  (163, 15)
  • unwittingly — not done on purpose; unintentionally; unknowingly  (75, 40; 118, 29)
  • upbraided — to have found fault with someone; scolded; reprimanded, rebuked  (207, 39)
  • usurer — a person who lends money at unreasonably high rates of interest  (86, 35)
  • usurp — to take a position of power or importance illegally or by force  (16, 9; 183, 7)
  • usurper — one who takes a position of power or importance illegally or by force  (11, 13)
  • utterances — spoken words, statements, or vocal sounds; remarks, comments  (76, 33; 90, 12; 178, 19; 200, 28; 202, 31)
  • uxorious — having or showing an excessive or submissive fondness for one’s wife  (132, 17)

V-V-V-V-V-V-V-V

  • vacillating — alternating or wavering between different opinions or actions; being indecisive  (180, 5)
  • vague — of uncertain, indefinite, or unclear character or meaning  (11, 36; 110, 2)
  • vagueness — uncertainly, indistinct nature  (100, 23)
  • vapid — offering nothing that is stimulating or challenging; insipid, feeble, flat  (202, 16)
  • variegated — marked by variety, exhibiting differences  (135, 37)
  • vaunted — praised or boasted about, especially in an excessive way  (210, 40)
  • vehemence — the state of showing strong feeling; a state of forcefulness and passion  (126, 40)
  • vehement — showing strong feeling; forceful, passionate, or intense; ardent  (121, 33; 153, 16)
  • vehemently — in such a manner as to show strong, passionate, or intense feelings  (221, 39)
  • vehicle — a thing used to express, embody, or fulfill something; channel, means  (99, 39)
  • veil — cover, conceal, disguise, or camouflage  (197, 17)
  • veneer — an attractive appearance that covers or disguises someone or something’s true nature or feelings  (19, 35)
  • vengeance — punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong; retribution  (103, 12; 120, 17; 185, 40; 203, 26)
  • venom — extreme malice and bitterness shown in someone’s attitudes, speech, or actions  (182, 19)
  • vent  — give free expression to a strong emotion  (95, 8; 103, 32)
  • verger — an official in a church who acts as a caretaker and attendant, or who walks before a priest with a rod  (102, 32)
  • verity — a true principle or belief  (13, 13)
  • vernal — of, in, or appropriate to spring  (124, 13)
  • vestige — a trace of something that is disappearing or no longer exists; remnant  (81, 26)
  • vestments — garments, especially a ceremonial or official robe, usually worn by priests or religious officials  (88, 36)
  • vigil – a period of keeping awake during the time usually spent asleep, especially to keep watch or pray  (115, 13)
  • vindicate — to clear someone of blame or suspicion; acquit, clear of  (199, 2)
  • vindication — clearing someone of blame or suspicion; absolving, acquitting  (104, 19)
  • vindictive — having or showing a strong or unreasoning desire for revenge  (171, 21)
  • viper — a venomous snake with large hinged fangs, typically having a broad head and stout body, with dark patterns on a lighter background  (52, 9)
  • visitants — visitors, guests, celebrants  (137, 27)
  • vivid — producing powerful feelings or strong, clear images in the mind; graphic, evocative  (99, 34; 118, 14)
  • voluptuous — relating to or characterized by luxury or sensual pleasure  (5, 2; 63, 38; 106, 20; 180, 4)
  • votary — a person, such as a monk or nun, who has made vows of dedication to a religious work or effort  (ix, 31; 210, 20)
  • vouchsafe — give or grant something to someone in a gracious or condescending manner  (50, 31; 64, 11; 71, 19; 92, 21; 104, 22; 122, 29; 126, 26; 133, 23; 134, 3)
  • vulgar — lacking sophistication or good taste; unrefined; gross, crass  (44, 5; 62, 17; 104, 13; 142, 37; 193, 27)
  • vulgarity — a behavior or mannerism that lacks sophistication or good taste; an unrefined trait or characteristic  (167, 4)

W-W-W-W-W-W-W-W

  • wail — a prolonged high-pitched cry of pain, grief, or anger; a howl, a yowl  (130, 11)
  • waive — refrain from applying or enforcing a rule, restriction, or fee; disregard, ignore  (76, 27; 222, 8)
  • wane — decrease in vigor, power, or extent; become weaker; decline, diminish  (123, 26; 132, 10)
  • waning — decreasing in vigor, power, or extent; becoming weaker; declining, diminishing  (94, 31)
  • wanton — deliberately cruel, violent and unprovoked  (55, 22; 98, 8)
  • wastefulness — the tendency to or practice of using or expending something of value carelessly, extravagantly, or to no purpose  (188, 40)
  • wattled — made, enclosed, or filled up with material for making fences, walls, etc., consisting of rods or stakes interlaced with twigs or branches  (67, 1)
  • wavering — becoming weaker; faltering; hesitating  (190, 40)
  • wayfarer — a person who travels on foot  (5, 1; 188, 37)
  • weltering — moving in a turbulent fashion  (118, 28)
  • wend — go in a specified direction, typically slowly or by an indirect route  (85, 15)
  • wending — going in a specified direction, but slowly or by an indirect route  (105, 33)
  • wholly — entirely; fully, completely  (84, 8; 92, 3; 92, 22; 94, 36; 100, 24; 100, 35; 102, 38; 112, 4; 122, 12; 131, 19; 163, 14;  178, 35; 188, 40; 199, 16)
  • wicker — pliable twigs, typically of willow, plaited or woven to make items such as furniture and baskets  (86, 40)
  • wiles — devious or cunning stratagems employed in manipulating or persuading someone to do what one wants  (59, 10)
  • willfully — intentionally, deliberately  (161, 38)
  • wily — skilled at gaining an advantage, especially deceitfully  (48, 20; 83, 39)
  • winebibber — a habitual drinker of alcohol  (59, 23)
  • wondrous — inspiring a feeling of wonder or delight; marvelous, fantastic  (99, 22)
  • wont — one’s customary behavior in a particular situation; habit, practice, convention  (115, 2)
  • worldling — a cosmopolitan and sophisticated person  (208, 25)
  • wrangled — had a long and complicated dispute, argued, bickered, squabbled  (195, 30)
  • wrangling — having a long and complicated dispute; bickering, squabbling  (87, 9)
  • wrath — extreme anger, rage, fury, ire  (104, 38)
  • wrathful — in a manner displaying anger, rage, fury, or ire  (194, 15; 200, 34)
  • wreathing — covering, surrounding, or encircling something  (119, 30)
  • wretch — a despicable or contemptible person  (109, 16; 125, 22)
  • wretched — grim, despicable  (46, 19; 86, 15; 175, 11; 202, 34; 203, 6)
  • wrought — archaic past and past participle of the verb ‘work’  (77, 41; 199, 14)

Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z-Z

  • zeal — great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objective; passion  (45, 19; 57 6; 117, 39; 128, 37)
  • zealot — a person who is fanatical and uncompromising in pursuit of their religious, political, or other ideals  (171, 9)
  • zenith — the time at which something is most powerful or successful; acme, high point  (151, 38)

Click here to return to the Main Menu